Michael AW

MichaelAW.com
Fellow International – The Explorer Club, www.explorers.org
Fellow – International League of Conservation Photographers, www.ILCP.org

Michael AW saturated colour imageries have earned him more than 63 international awards.
In 2013, Michael is honored with the NOGI award, presented by the American Academy of Underwater Arts and Sciences.  Michael is the first Asian to be nominated and win this prestigious accolade. In 2012, Michael’s ‘Indonesia’s Global Treasures’ won the International Prize for Best Book of the Year at the World Underwater Pictures Festival (Festival Mondial de l'Image Sous Marine). This artistic book of the sea category yielded entries from a host of international authors and photographers including books published by media powerhouses from UK, Germany, Singapore, USA and France, but it is “Global Treasures” that received the Palme d'Or (Gold) award.  Michael is the first to have won this prestigious award twice; the first was for “Heart of the Ocean” in 2009.

Recently, Outdoor Photography named Michael AW as one of the world’s most influential nature photographer. His essays and images have been featured in BBC Wildlife, National Geographic, the Smithsonian, Nature, Ocean Geographic, Times, Nature Focus to name just a few. In 2010 he won the the prestigious Gold Diver award for the highly contested Portfolio category at the World Festival of Underwater Pictures in France. This is the first time an Asian has won this category. He is also a recipient of awards from the Natural History Museum BBC Photographer of the Year Wildlife Competition in 2000, 2010 and in 2006 he won the Best Winner award in the underwater category.  In 2008 Stan Waterman conferred Michael with the Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Award by Sharks Research Institute in recognition of his highly-effective and unrelenting campaign against shark fin soup consumption in the Asia Pacific region. Michael is also a recipient of the prestigious WYLAND ICON award for Conservation in 2011 and in 2012; he was presented the Diver of the Year Award at the Beneath the Sea Festival in New Jersey.   

Michael remains today, an active member of the Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers and the Fellow International of The Explorer Club NY. Fellow  members include Sir Edmund Hillary, Roald Amundsen , Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, David Doubilet, Emory Kristof, to name a few. Michael is also project director of the Elysium Epic imagery expedition with 57 team members to document the flora and fauna for a movie and climate change index from the Antarctic Peninsula to South Georgia, following in the footsteps of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1914-16 Trans Antarctic Expedition.  (www.ElysiumEpic.org)

“Beneath Bunaken”(1993) was his first and Elysium Shackleton Antarctic Epics (2013)  is his 30th book of the sea.

MILESTONES

In 1998 Michael co-founded Asian Geographic; he managed the title as publisher till 2005. In 2001, he acquired Scuba Diver Australasia and successfully revamped the title to become the PADI Diving Society magazine in 2004. In 2007, Michael garnered some of the world’s most celebrated underwater photographers, film makers, scientists to be on board his dream journal Ocean Geographic. The current editorial board now comprised of Dr Gerry Allen, Dr Carden Wallace, Emory Kristof, Stan Waterman, David Doubilet, Jennifer Hayes, Cabel Davis, Laurent Ballesta, Doug Perrine, Howard Hall, Michelle Hall, Alex Mustard and Wyland. Today Asian Geographic, Ocean Geographic and Scuba Diver SDAA are among the world’s acclaimed wildlife journals.

Michael AW is the founder of OceanNEnvironment, a charity organization registered with Environment Australia.


Nick Coburn Philips

Raised in Snowdonia where the mountains and castles meet the sea ~ Nick has always loved the Ocean. His first encounter with dolphins was when he was just six years old. Nick studied science at college and Biological Sciences at Plymouth University with studies in SCUBA diving as part of the course, later specialising in Marine Zoology at Bangor University. He has a Masters degree in Offshore & Ocean Technology specialising in Diving & Underwater Technology from Cranfield University and ROV pilot qualifications from The Underwater Centre, Fort William, Scotland.

He's been diving for almost 20 years. He first visited Brunei in 2001 and dived the Oil & Gas platforms of Kuala Belait with the Panaga Shell Dive Team. Later he moved to Bandar and dived with the Bandar Sub Aqua Dive Club and Oceanic Quest. He has good science based knowledge of the area, particularly 'deep diving' the wrecks and the local reefs.

In 2010, after the Gulf of Mexico Horizon Oil Spill disaster, Nick's work took him to USA where he worked as Marine Photographer for the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. He made and marketed a movie called "Colours of the Gulf" which was presented in Mississippi at the local Cultural and Arts Centre. Since then he has shown it to students and staff of University Brunei Darussalam and at the 'Carbon Gardens' event at the Radisson Hotel. His exhibit on Marine Awareness at the Rainforest Gallery Kiulap was well received locally by many artists and also by students from schools enthused by his photography.

His facebook page BORNEO SHARKARMA advocating the protection of shark species has escalated to over 1.4 million in social outreach over the past 3 years. Both paper petitions and online petitions to Government have worked towards the proposal to ban shark fin products in Brunei Darussalam. Nick's films have reached the Hamptons Wildlife Conservation Film Festival in New York, more recently the Asian Dive Show in Singapore and his images have been much appreciated at the International Festival of the Sea in Rome, Italy

Peter Scoones (UK), cinematographer BBC 2009

Film Credits:
"The Blue Planet" (camera operator) (1 episode, 2001)
Ocean World (2001) TV episode
Amazing Earth (1998) (TV)
"Life in the Freezer" (camera team)
Footsteps in the Snow (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Door Closes (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Race to Breed (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Ice Retreats (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Bountiful Sea (1993) TV episode (camera team)
Nature" (2 episodes, 2003-2007)
Voyage of the Lonely Turtle (2007) TV episode
White Shark/Red Triangle (2003) TV episode
Galápagos (2007) (TV)
The Making of 'Deep Blue' (2006) (V)
"Wild Indonesia" (3 episodes, 1999)
Creatures of Island Kingdoms (1999) TV episode
The Mystery of Sulawesi (1999) TV episode
Where Worlds Collide (1999) TV episode
Great White Shark (1995) (TV)
"Sea Trek" (1991) (mini) TV mini-series
"The Trials of Life" (2 episodes, 1990)
Continuing the Line (1990) TV episode
Talking to Strangers (1990) TV episode
"The Living Planet" (1 episode, 1984)
The Open Ocean (1984) TV episode
"Life on Earth" (1 episode, 1979)
 Invasion of the Land (1979) TV episode

When Peter Scoones was serving in the Royal Air Force in the Far East in the early 1960’s the shops only stocked facemasks. He bought one so he could more easily see to scrub the hull of his racing dinghy. However, one glimpse of the colourful fish and scenery below was sufficient to arouse a passion that has taken him to the highest ranks of the world’s most highly regarded wildlife underwater cameramen.

He trained as a naval architect but, when he was due to be called up for National Service, instead decided to sign up for the RAF and “let them teach me something useful”. That was photography and he learned to use and repair everything from 35mm to 5in x 4in film cameras as well as cine models. He also did everything from pack shots and portraits to air-to-air photography.

At the same time he made housings in Perspex so he could take his photography underwater and soon began to produce results that went on to win gold medals at international film festivals. At the same time, he and his friends formed their own diving club, devised training programmes and taught themselves to dive with the assistance of the local Royal Navy unit.

At the end of his time in the RAF Peter returned to the UK and began working in the photographic trade as colour manager of a Fleet Street processing laboratory. That was when he met Colin Doeg and together, in 1967, they formed the British Society of Underwater Photographers.

The Society’s first splash-ins were at Shoreham and Swanage, on the south coast. Later they moved to Fort Bovisand at Plymouth and the on-the-day shoot-out format that Peter devised is now the basis of competitions throughout the world, including the CMAS world title event. Led by Peter, some of the members used to process the day’s films in the dungeons at the Fort and the audience voted for their favourite images, a practice adopted by BsoUP to overcome the fierce controversies that usually followed judges’ decisions at contests.
                      
Peter moved on to join a company that made housings and underwater cameras for the oil industry as well as providing film and photographic services. He used to amaze his friends with his ability to return from an assignment in tropical waters one day and be packed and ready to fly to Aberdeen the next morning to work on a North Sea oil rig.

While he was working for that company he had his big break. The BBC heard that he had developed a special low light television camera and wanted to hire it for an expedition to the Comoros to film coelacanths, the oldest fish in the world. Peter said the camera was only available if he came along to operate it … and that is how he first met David Attenborough, who is instantly recognisable throughout the world as the voice and face of wildlife films.

The method of controlling the camera was crude. It was dangled deep in the ocean at the end of a steel hawser that was raised, lowered and twisted to direct it. Eventually the camera met its fate when it was trapped in a gully and torn adrift from the hawser but the expedition led to a continuing involvement with the BBC’s Natural History Unit and strings of awards for the films and videos for which his work was a major or total part.

In the process he has dived everywhere from the tropics to beneath the ice. He knows the world’s oceans like most people know their own garden or street. He is the only person to have been awarded the title of British Underwater Photographer of the Year twice.

Dr Phil Nyutten – Deep Sea Explorer 2005, 2009

Dr. Phil Nuytten has spent his life in subsea exploration. He has logged many thousands of hours underwater world-wide as a working commercial diver and as a developer of underwater equipment and techniques. He is widely regarded as one of the pioneers of the modern commercial diving industry and a significant force in the creation of new technology.  In the 1960's and 70's, Nuytten was heavily involved in experimental deep-diving and the development of mixed gas decompression tables. In 1968 he was a member of the team that completed the first 600 foot ocean ‘bounce’ dives on ‘Project Nesco’, and in 1972 he wrote the protocol for ‘Deep Work 1000’, the first North American thousand foot saturation dive. These early projects helped set the international standards in use today. During this period, Phil Nuytten co-founded Oceaneering International Inc. Oceaneering International pioneered many early subsea development projects, and has gone on to become one of the largest underwater skills companies in the world.

In the 1970’s, working with long-time colleague Dr. Joe MacInnis, Nuytten headed the equipment research component of a series of high-arctic expeditions. Among the goals of these expeditions was the testing of his own designs of life-support gear for use in polar and sub-polar conditions. In 1984, Phil Nuytten appeared on the cover of National Geographic Magazine for his record dives through ice-covered arctic waters onto the ‘Breadalbane’, the northern-most known shipwreck. His involvement in underwater activities in virtually all of the world’s oceans has resulted in articles on his work in Reader’s Digest, Business Week, Newsweek, Time, Popular Science, Discovery, Fortune, and Scientific American, as well as dozens of dozens of diving and aerospace technical journals. Nuytten is a popular speaker at underwater conferences around the world and has published numerous technical papers on his leading-edge work in subsea technology.

Dr. Phil Nuytten has been instrumental in the development and current acceptance of Atmospheric Diving System technology. In 1979, he began work on a revolutionary new one-atmosphere diving suit that resulted in a patented break-through in rotary joint design, and formed the basis for the world-famous ‘Newtsuit’. The ‘Newtsuit’ is a thousand foot-rated hard suit that completely protects the wearer from outside pressure and eliminates the need for decompression while still maintaining mobility and dexterity – a “submarine that you wear”. It is now standard equipment in many of the world’s navies.

In1997, Nuytten and his design team produced the two thousand foot-rated micro-submersible ‘DeepWorker 2000’: a revolutionary deep-diving system that has been called an “underwater sports car”. Nuytten and Nuytco Research Ltd. received a five year contract from the National Geographic Society to provide DeepWorker 2000 submersibles and crews on Dr. Sylvia Earle’s ‘Sustainable Seas Expeditions’: an initiative to study deep ocean environmental impact. The use of the DeepWorker micro-subs to explore and monitor National marine sanctuaries has already increased scientists’ understanding of underwater ecology, habitats, and biodiversity.

In 1999, NASA contracted a pair of DeepWorkers to study their possible use in the recovery of the Space Shuttle booster rockets, and in 2000 DeepWorkers successfully recovered the Space Shuttle booster rockets from the May flight to the U.S. Space Station. NASA is currently studying acquisition of a pair of titanium Deepworkers specifically dedicated to booster rocket recovery. Nuytten’s work with NASA spans more than twenty-five years, and he has published several papers on space applications of undersea technology. He is also a senior member of the American Association of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a life member of the American Association of Underwater Scientists.

Also in the year 2000, Nuytten introduced a new concept for an ultra light weight, swimming, hard suit called the ‘Exosuit’. Nuytten and his team recently completed a contract for the Canadian Department of National Defence to examine the feasibility of using the Exosuit as a submarine escape device. The Beta prototype of the Exosuit underwent swim testing in 2005 and target date for release is 2006. Plans to utilize a space version of the Exosuit are under discussion and Nuytten and his team are currently training astronauts from the Canadian Space Agency as pilots of the DeepWorker 2000 submersibles.

In 2003, Nuytten and his design team completed the first side-by-side Dual DeepWorker, designed for a pilot and one observer. Designed with the use of deep-depth underwater tourism in mind, this 2000’ rated submersible has commercial and scientific applications as well. Dr. Phil Nuytten has earned many international honours and awards. These include commercial diving’s highest award from the Association of Diving Contractors International, the Academy of Underwater Art and Sciences ‘Nogi’ award, induction into the ‘Diving Hall of Fame’, and the Explorer’s Club’s prestigious ‘Lowell Thomas’ Award. In 1992, Nuytten was awarded the Order of British Columbia, his home province’s highest honour, in recognition of his role in making British Columbia one of the world centres of underwater technology.

His outstanding Canadian achievements were recognized again in 2000 when he received the Canadian Underwater Pioneer Award. In 2001 Nuytten received the Jules Verne Award in Paris for his international accomplishments in the subsea field. Dr. Phil Nuytten has spent nearly forty years to developing undersea systems that have the safety of the diving technician as their common theme. His goal has been to provide scientific, technical, military, and sport divers full access to continental shelf depths without the hazards of decompression, so that humans can explore, learn about and - ultimately - protect the world’s oceans.


Stan Waterman – Film maker; President, Shark’s Research Institute 2002, 2008

Stan Waterman has received numerous honors and awards for his work in television and in behalf of the sea including five Emmys, two Gold Medals from the U.K. Underwater Film Festival, four Golden Eagles, a lifetime Achievement Award from the Miami Expo and from Boston Sea Rovers, the Cousteau Diver of the Year Award, the Richard Hopper Day Memorial Medal from the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, the Reaching Out Award from the Diving Equipment and Marketing Association, and most recently has been named to the International Scuba Diving Hall of Fame . The Discovery Channel produced and broadcast a two-hour biographical special about Mr. Waterman, The Man Who Loves Sharks.

Stan Waterman has been at the forefront of scuba diving since its inception as a recreational sport both in this country and throughout the world. His attraction to the underwater world began as a schoolboy in 1936 when he first dived with a Japanese Ama diver's mask in Florida. In the 1950's, inspired by Jacques Cousteau's revolutionary invention of the Aqua Lung, Mr. Waterman acquired the first one in Maine and went on to pioneer scuba diving in that state.

Between 1954 and 1958 he operated a dive business in the Bahamas with a boat he had built specially for diving. His first 16mm film on diving was produced during those years. For the next fifteen years, Mr. Waterman continued to record his worldwide journeys and exploits on film; most were ultimately purchased as television documentaries. In 1965 he took his entire family - wife and three children - to Tahiti. Their careers as television stars were launched when National Geographic purchased the rights to air his film of that year-long experience.

In 1968 he collaborated with Peter Gimbel on the classic shark film, Blue Water, White Death. He was associate producer and underwater cameraman during the seven-month long production. However, he may be best know for his work in commercial film. He was co-director of underwater photography and second unit in the production of The Deep, based on Peter Benchley's best-selling novel. In other collaborations with his close friend and neighbor, Mr. Benchley, he was responsible for ten years' worth of productions for ABC's "American Sportsman Show". More recent productions include documentaries for ABC's "Spirit of Adventure" series and the "Expedition Earth" series on ESPN.

Mr. Waterman graduated from Dartmouth in 1946, where he studied with Robert Frost and earned a B.A. in English. He has maintained an appreciation of language and literature throughout his life. He is married and is the father of two sons and a daughter, each of whom has acquired a special love of the sea from him. He and his oldest son, Gordy, a successful cameraman in his own right, won the first father and son Emmy for their work together in the "National Geographic Explorer" production, Dancing With Stingrays. Mr. Waterman maintains residences in New Jersey and Maine.

Mr. Waterman's first book, Sea Salt, was published in 2005 and is in its second printing. Mr. Waterman continues to dive, film, lecture, and hosts dive tours.


EMORY KRISTOF 2007, 2011

A pioneer of innovative, high-tech underwater photography using robot cameras and remotely operated vehicles, Emory Kristof has been aNational Geographic photographer since beginning as an intern for the magazine in 1963.

Kristof created the preliminary designs of the electronic camera system for theArgo vehicle, which found the Titanic. He led photographic surveys of the C.S.S. Alabama off the coast of France in 1992 and the 16th-century wreck San Diego in the Philippines in 1993. In 1995, he led an expedition to recover the bell of the Edmund Fitzgerald and produced the first deep-water images with high-definition TV.

Kristof's "Testing the Waters of Rongelap," published in National Geographicmagazine in April 1998, recorded oceanic life in the nuclear weapons-contaminated waters surrounding the Marshall Islands. In August 1998, Kristof's pictures of the Titanic were presented in the National Geographic article "Tragedy in Three Dimensions." The pictures, recorded in 1991 using high-intensity lighting systems, appeared in unprecedented detail because of advances in 3-D computer video-editing.

Born in 1942, Kristof studied journalism at the University of Maryland at College Park and received a bachelor's degree in 1964. A National Geographic staff photographer from 1964 to 1994, he has produced forty-some articles for the magazine.

Kristof has earned many awards for both writing and photography, including the NOGI Award for Arts from the Underwater Society of America in 1988 and the Explorers Club Lowell Thomas Award for Underwater Exploration in 1986. That same year, Kristof and Robert Ballard received the American Society of Magazine Publishers Innovation in Photography Award for their photographic coverage of the Titanic. In 1998, Kristof was presented with the J. Winton Lemen Fellowship Award by the National Press Photographers Association "for being one of our profession's most imaginative innovators." In 2001 Kristof was named a contributing photographer-in-residence at the National Geographic Society.

 

 

Howard & Michelle Hall 2011

Award-winning natural history filmmakers and photographers Howard and Michele Hall  have produced and directed many television films including a National Geographic Special, three episodes of the PBS series Nature and the five-hour PBS series Secrets of the Ocean Realm. Their television work has resulted in seven Emmy Awards.

But they are perhaps best known for their underwater IMAX films.  As Director and Producer, respectively, their IMAX feature film credits include the IMAX3D feature Into the Deep; Island of the Sharks, Coral Reef Adventure (in which they are also featured on camera), Deep Sea 3D, and most recently the IMAX3D feature Under the Sea3D.  Howard has been the underwater cinematographer and/or Director of Underwater Cinematography on 4 other IMAX features.

Prof Chou Loke Ming : 2011

CHOU Loke Ming is Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore. He obtained his PhD in Zoology from the University of Singapore and has done extensive research on coral reef ecology and integrated coastal management. His studies on coral reefs covered the ASEAN region and Okinawa. His current research focus is reef restoration after having observed the region’s widespread degradation of the habitat. He helped to initiate Singapore’s first coral nursery in 2007 and is looking at how corals can be re-established in developed coastal areas under highly turbid conditions.

Prof. Chou has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (International Coral reef Initiative) ever since its formation and served as Chairman from 2003 to 2005. In early 2010, he was invited to be a member of GESAMP (Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection). He is currently an Honorary Fellow of the Singapore Institute of Biology.

He has provided consultancy services in the field of marine environment management to international agencies like the United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organisation, World Bank, WorldFish Center, and many national agencies. He has more than 100 papers in international journals and over 40 book chapters in the field of marine environment.


Leandro Blanco, Multi awards winner -Film maker 2004, 2009

Born in Spain, Leandro is the most celebrated underwater music video maker in the world. In the year 2002, for the first time in the history of the World Festival of Underwater Pictures, Antibes, the judges awarded him a honorary award for his three videos “Ocean chronicles”  “Shame on you” and “With the flow” for his creative expression and his commitment to the protection of the environment.  In 2004 he is named Diver of the year i n the United States at BTS (Beneath the Sea) in New York for his contribution to the art of film making , and in 2007 Greenpeace acknowledged Leandro Blanco the “Oceans Award” for his film “One for All”. The same film also won the “Celebrate the Sea 2007” Rolex Award of Excellence” for short documentary.

 At the age of five, he moves to New York with his family. During his high school he forms a vocal group.  When he turns fourteen he won first prize at a musical festival in New York’s world fair. The Tokens, who by then had a number one hit in the charts (“The lion sleeps tonight”), become their producers. He continued to make several albums with his group and spends most of the time promoting and touring the United States.   He took up flying as a hobby and gets his private pilots license at the age of nineteen.  In 1970 he returns to Spain, he recorded several albums, including a double LP with his repertoire of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons by VIVALDI. He also wrote several music scores for motion pictures.

In 1973 he decides to turn his hobby into a career and becomes a commercial airline pilot. Today he’s an Airbus 340 captain flying for a mayor international airline company.  It was back in the 80s when the first music videos came out, that got him started in filming. It was the magic of the music, moving along with the fast cutting images that caught his interest.

His passion for nature had already taken him all over the world.  By then he had also written several pieces of music celebrating the beauty of the Amazon jungle and the vast desserts of Africa.   His first short documentary got him first prize at the London film festival, and by 1990 he had already won several mayor awards, including “VIDEO FILM MAKER OF THE YEAR” BY THE BBC WILD LIFE MAGAZINE, for his documentary skills for his video There’s a place.  In 1990 he makes his first underwater documentary, which he wrote, narrated, edited, performed and wrote all the music.

 It’s during these years that he decides to devote all his spare time to the underwater world.  He has received over 50 international awards for his documentaries, and his music scores have been acclaimed by magazines like BILLBOARD. He is also an honorary member of THE ROYAL PHOTOGRAFIC SOCIETY, for his photography in the video “JUST PASSING BY TOO”

 In 1999 he receives one of the most important underwater video award at the World Underwater Pictures Festival Antibes for the film “Missing You – a music documentary in memory of Jacque Yves Cousteau. Since then he is the only person that has won this prestigious award in eight consecutive years.   He was the co-producer of several documentaries on the Maldives with the famous underwater photographer MICHAEL AW. He has also worked with Michael on the “24 hours beneath a Rainbow Sea” documentary produced for the National Geographic Channel broadcast worldwide. World acclaimed photographers like David Doubilet and legendary film makers like Stan Waterman, have all praised for his work.


Howard Shaw, Executive Director, Singapore Environment Council 2009

Howard Shaw is Executive Director of the Singapore Environment Council (SEC), a non-government organization working with business, government and civil society to help raise environmental awareness and promote greater levels of sustainability for Singapore.

He graduated from Oxford Brookes University in 1995 with a degree in environmental biology and business administration, and has been a leading figure in Singapore's green movement ever since, playing a key role in shaping the country's environmental policy.

In his role with the SEC he oversees the council's outreach programmes with educational bodies and the business community, and represents the council on various national bodies, including the US-Singapore Free Trade Agreement's Environmental Review Committee, and the Action Plan Committee for the Singapore Green Plan 2012.


David Doubilet – National Geographic – photographer in residence 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009

One of the world’s leading underwater photographers, David Doubilet has shot more than 60 stories for National Geographic magazine since 1972. Doubilet’s undersea reporting has taken him to the Red Sea, Pearl Harbor, the South Pacific and beyond. He has captured groundbreaking images of great white sharks, flashlight fish, shark-repelling flounders, creatures of the undersea desert, flourescent coral, WW II wrecks and much more.

A consummate artist, award-winning photographer David Doubilet began photographing underwater environments at the age of 12 in the cold, green seas off the northern New Jersey coast. He used a Brownie Hawkeye camera wrapped in a clear plastic bag, and he's been behind the lens ever since. In 1971 he began contracting as a photographer for the National Geographic Society, and he now has photo- graphed over 50 articles for National Geographic magazine. About his work for National Geographic, Doubilet says, "My job description is to make a picture of a place no one has ever seen before...or to make a picture that's different of a place that everybody's seen before."

Doubilet's recent assignments have taken him to the waters around Australia. Off Australia's southern coast, he focused on the endangered great white shark. Doubilet observed, "The great white shark is the ultimate predator, a living myth. But it is not a nightmare...It dominates its world, but is threatened by ours."

One of National Geographic's most popular and entertaining speakers, Doubilet will offer a thrilling behind-the-scenes look at these two marvels of the ocean world. He will also describe a long-term research and conservation initiative being undertaken by the National Geographic Society to encourage better stewardship of the oceans.

David Doubilet was born 11/28/46 in New York City.  Now age 52, he began snorkeling at the age of eight in the cold, green seas off the northern New Jersey coast.  By the age of thirteen, he was taking black and white pictures above and below the sea with his first camera -- a pre-war Leica. Parts of summer and winter vacations were spent at Small Hope Bay Lodge on Andros Island in the Bahamas.  He worked as a diving guide and on days off would take his camera.  Doubilet later spent several summers working as a diver and photographer for the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratories in New Jersey.  He is presently a Contract Freelance Photographer for the National Geographic Society where he has been steadily working for twenty-seven years.

In 1965 Doubilet began studying film and journalism at Boston University's College of Communication.  He majored in still photography and graduated in 1970 with a Bachelor of Science degree.  In 1988 he received their Distinguished Alumni of the Year award.  During the summer of 1966, he attended a pilot course in underwater photography at the Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California. Doubilet's first work for National Geographic Magazine was published in 1972.  Since then, as a Contract Photographer for NGM, he has produced over fifty stories for the magazine, in recent years adding author to his credit line of photographer.  His warm-water work has taken him throughout Indonesia, Micronesia, Australia and New Guinea in the Pacific; Sri Lanka and the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean; and all over the Caribbean.  The Red Sea, his favorite "underwater studio", has produced at least ten different stories for the magazine.  Cold-water work has immersed him off the coast of England; in Scotland's Loch Ness; into the teeming waters of the Galapagos; around the mysterious shores of Japan; and deep in Canada's Northwest Pacific.  He has also worked off the entire eastern coast of the United States -- from Maine to the Florida Keys -- and California.

Doubilet's photography has won many prizes including in 1969 the prestigious "Sara Prize and International Award" given by Mondo Sommerso Magazine in Italy.  He was the first American and the youngest person to win this award.  In 1975 he was named "Diver of the Year" by the Boston Sea Rovers, one of the diving world's most honorable organizations.  He has also received several honorable mentions by the National Press Photographer's Association over the last decade.  In 1993 he was honored in France by winning first place trophy in the Professional Category of an international contest sponsored by C.M.A.S.  (World Underwater Federation); and by appearing as Guest of Honor at the 20th World Festival of Underwater Photography in Cap D'Antibes. Although most of Doubilet's photographic time is spent working for the National Geographic Society and its diverse publications, his work has also appeared worldwide in other magazines and books.  His commercial work includes several ad campaigns for clients such as Kodak, Fa Soap, Vitaspa, Seagrams, and Microsoft.  He did the still photography for two films -- THE DEEP and SPLASH.

Doubilet's first book, LIGHT IN THE SEA, was published in 1989 by Thomasson-Grant in the USA.  Foreign editions were printed in Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy and Japan.  Doubilet's second book PACIFIC: AN UNDERSEA JOURNEY was published in 1992 by Bulfinch Press, received an award from the American Institute of Graphic Arts and went into a soft-cover edition in Japan.  UNDER THE SEA FROM A TO Z written by Anne L. Doubilet with photographs by David Doubilet was published in 1991 by Crown Press (Random House) and received notable mentions from a national organization of science teachers and a national children's panel.

A popular speaker and instructor, Doubilet has appeared on the "Today Show" on NBC-TV and is in demand for his lectures and slide shows at universities, underwater film festivals and clubs (the Explorer's Club and the Harvard Club both in NYC) around the world.  In 1993 Doubilet broadcast a live underwater interview for National Public Radio from twenty feet deep in Ginnie Springs, Florida.  In 1995-1996 Doubilet and his work are featured in a national advertising campaign for the Rolex Watch Co. From 1994 through 1996 he is the author of a popular monthly feature entitled "Magnificent Moments", including text and photography, in Japan's SINRA Magazine.



Dr Carden Wallace*, Principal Scientist, Museum of Tropical Queensland 2003

With her appointment in 1987 as Curator in Charge, Carden Wallace became the first woman to head the Museum of Tropical Queensland in Townsville. Carden began her lifetime journey into the sciences in 1970, with an honours degree in science at the University of Queensland, and a thesis on earthworms. Carden has been the balancing home commitments with long hours of fieldwork since the birth of her two sons between 1974 and 1978.

In 1979 Carden completed a PhD at the University of Queensland, her research still on invertebrates but now directed to tropical marine ecology with a study of soft corals, Acropora. Throughout the period since 1974, Carden's marine science research has been indicated in an extensive list of papers, reports and contributions to significant publications, including ‘A Coral Reef Handbook’, edited by Patricia Mather and Ian Bennett, and ‘Coral Reefs’, edited by L Hammond.

High points in her career include the POL Prize for Environmental Research, awarded in 1992 to Carden along with four other scientists from James Cook University for their exciting discovery of mass annual spawning on the Great Barrier Reef by over a hundred species of coral. Carden's own research has focused on biogeography and biodiversity, particularly on corals and tropical biota. Her current interests are directed towards other tropical countries, especially Indonesia. She feels strongly that scientists should give back all they possibly can, in communicating and applying the results of their work.



Daniel Mercier – Founder, World Underwater Pictures Festival Antibes 2003, 2004, 2007

Daniel Mercier was born in 1931 in Clamart in the Parisian region. Sensitive to his environment, he has spent all his life making divers and people aware of sea wealth and resources. In 1967, he became a State scubadiving instructor. Today, he possesses his State 3rd degree, the best at a national level. He made more than 7,000 dives in the world oceans and seas, as much in exploration dives as being a Sea Instructor and Guide.  He created the first World Festival of Underwater Pictures in 1974. Its aim was to promote underwater world, to stimulate image creation and to make this event a place where sea lovers can meet. Convinced that promoting submarine funds and scubadives environment is necessary, Daniel Mercier untiringly continues to make most people know them all over the world.

He was awarded a great number of rewards as Youth and Sport Gold Medal, International Academy of Underwater Sciences and Techniques Member, in 1997, he was named Man of the Year of scuba diving world in Israel.   

 

WYLAND* - Artist of the Sea, Founder, Wyland Foundation, Ocean Artists Society 2004

Marine Life Artist Wyland has earned the distinction as one of America’s most unique creative influences, and a leading advocate for marine resource conservation. An accomplished painter, sculptor, photographer, writer, and SCUBA diver, he has traveled the farthest reaches of the globe for more than twenty-five years, capturing the raw power and beauty of the undersea universe. His non-pro?t Wyland Foundation has supported numerous conservation programs since 1993, including Wyland’s monumental Whaling Wall mural project — an epic series of more than ninety-one life size marine life murals that spans twelve countries on four continents, and is viewed by an estimated 1 billion people every year. The artist’s efforts, moreover, have been recognized by the United Nations, Sierra Club, the Underwater Academy of Arts and Sciences, where he is listed among its Diving Hall of Fame, and private and public institutions throughout the world.

Hailed a “Marine Michaelangelo” by USA Today, Wyland’s work is sought by millions of collectors and his galleries throughout the United States are considered a must-see on the itineraries of travelers everywhere. His equally successful Wyland Foundation, in partnership with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is actively engaged in teaching millions of students around engaged in teaching millions of students around our oceans, rivers, lakes, streams, and wetlands.

Listed in Who’s Who in American Art, the Guinness Book of World Records, and many other national and international publications, the multi-faceted artist has even hosted several series for television, including, “Wyland’s Ocean World” on the Discovery Channel’s Animal Planet Network. Today, he is considered one of the most influential artists of the 21st Century, with artwork in museums, corporate collections, and private homes in more than one hundred countries.


Michael AW – Director, Ocean Geographic, underwater photographer - Founder of Festival

Michael AW is the founding director of OceanNEnvironment, a charity organization listed with the Registrar of Environment Australia. The mission of OceanNEnvironment promotes and initiates preservation projects as well as endeavors to document the status of coral reefs, bio-diversity and the impact of man-made pollution through research programs, and measurable conservation projects. With OceanNEnvironment, he has initiated the Napoleon wrasse protection program in the Maldives, turtle nest adoption program in Indonesia and Say No to Shark Fins campaign in the South East Asia. As co-founder of Asian Geographic and publisher of Scuba Diver from 1998 to 2005, he used the magazines to support the conservation efforts of OceanNEnvironment. Taking conservation and education of the ocean to the next level, in 2007 Michael convened an editorial board comprising of Stan Waterman, David Doubilet, Emory Kristof, Gerry Allen PHD, Carden Wallace PHD, Alex Mustard PHD, Doug Perrine, Jennifer Hayes, and Christopher Lee to launch the hallmark of publication for the sea – Ocean Geographic.

Pursuing the art form of documentary photography, Michael AW is well known for his saturated colour imagery. His work on environmental issues and natural history, have been featured in BBC Wildlife, National Geographic, Asian Geographic, GEO, Underwater GEOGRAPHIC, Nature Focus, Action Asia, Scuba Diver, Smithsonian magazine, Ocean Realm (USA), Times, Asia Week, DIVE, Unterwasser, Tauchen, and Aquanaut, to name but a few. His photographs have received 50 awards from several international organizations including the prestigious Nikon International Photo Contest on three occasions.

Michael is a three time winner at the World Festival of Underwater Pictures, Antibes. In 2002 he won Best Music Adaptation for Video, the Gold Diver statue for Best Black & White print in 2005 and the Bronze stature for Portfolio the most prestigious category of festival in 2006. He is also a recipient of two awards from the Natural History Museum BBC Photographer of the Year Wildlife Competition in 2000 and in 2006 he won the Best Winner award in the underwater category.  

Over 25,000 of his images have appeared in various publications and exhibitions worldwide including the Australian Museum and Queensland Tropical Museum.  Michael has presented lectures and slide presentations on marine life and underwater photography to the Australian Museum Society, the Australian Maritime Museum, aquariums and private organizations in the pacific-rim countries including the world renowned Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. He has produced and directed two 24-hour photographic documentaries of corals reefs in the Australian Great Barrier Reef and the Maldives in 1995 and 1999 respectively. These extended sojourns have been encapsulated in books and a broadcast video documentary for National Geographic.

His first book, 'Beneath Bunaken' about the marine park in Sulawesi received the accolade of being the Presidential 'Gift of State' for Indonesia at APEC 1994. Subsequently in 1996 he produced for the Maldives – “Dreams from a Rainbow Sea”, which was used as official gift for the president, fishery and tourism offices. The Four Season Resort Maldives also used this title as premier gift for their guests. He was the co-author and photographer for TANAH AIR, bio-diversity of Indonesia. He has authored 25 natural history books about fishes, corals, invertebrates and he has also contributed to the Encyclopedias of Malaysia and Indonesia. He has collaborated with Dr. Carden Wallace in one of the most definitive book about the staghorn corals of the Indo-Pacific. His recent accomplished include the launch of “Celebrate the Sea” and Underwater Jungles both high quality case-bound collectors edition published in 2002.   In 2003 he completed “Richest Reefs – Indonesia”, a visual extravaganza from some of the most beautiful reefs in the world – this book is adopted by the Indonesian government as an official gift of state.  A feature documentary of the same title was also produced in 2003. His most recent work is ‘Beneath North SulaweSea’ released in October 2006 with a world wide launch in Birmingham, London, Antibes, Orlando and Singapore.

 

SCOTT TUASON, underwater photographer, author 2007, 2008

Scott started Scuba diving at the age of eleven in 1979. At that time he was diving without a license and had to wait until he was thirteen to get his first real formal training. By the time he was fifteen he was an advanced open water diver, and for his birthday Scott’s father gave him his first underwater camera. It was a Nikonos 5 w a 35mm lens. For many years of trail and error he used that camera to transform what he saw underwater to pictures. Most of the time with very poor results, however he knew by now that underwater photography was not something that could be learnt overnight. Scott went to college in 1986 at the University of Tampa with the hopes of getting a degree in marine biology. He never finished his marine – bio degree, instead he got a B.S. in economics and a minor in art (photography).  It was in those classes where he started to learn, not so much the technical aspects of photography but the art of seeing things.

Scott has been diving for 27 years and taking underwater pictures for 20 years. In 1990 he got an Open Water Instructor rating from PADI. Today Scott has logged over 4000 dives. He has dived all over the Philippines with the exception of the northern tip of Luzon and the eastern side of the Visayas and Mindanao. Outside of the Philippines, Scott has been fortunate enough to dive Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Maldives, Thailand, Myanmar, Vietnam, Papua New Guinea, Palau & Yap, Florida, Jamaica, Mexico, Bahamas and the Cayman Islands. Scott has just recently fulfilled his dream of diving with Great White sharks off the coast of Mexico.  Some of his favorite sites include Anilao, Batangas for macro photography and the Sulu Sea for wide-angle shots. He contributes regularly to Asian Diver, Sport Diving Australia, Scuba Globe Asia Pacific and Action Asia, including their “Adventure guide to the Philippines”. Scott has 3 coffee table books one entitled “The Philippine Coral Reefs in Watercolor”.  This book was done together with painter, Rafael Cusi. The other a large format picture book on the marine animals of Anilao, co-authored with Eduardo Cu Unjieng. The Anilao book won an award for photography at the 19th Philippine National book awards and the World grand prize for underwater image books at the 27th World Festival of Underwater Images in Antibes, France in the year 2000. As well in 2000 his photo of Mating Mandarin fish won first place at the Los Angeles Underwater Photographic Society’s international competition in the digital print category. His Turtle shot was runner-up in the Wide Angle print category and a Grey reef shark photo was honorable mention in the same category. His photos also placed 2nd in the WOW Philippines contest for both underwater and topside category. Scott’s 3rd book entitled The Ultimate Orient Philippine South Sea Pearls was published in March 2002; it is the story of the pearl told in pictures. He was commissioned by Jewelmer International to shoot the book, which was a corporate gift to their preferred clients. Scott was also a major contributor to the recently published South East Asia Diving Guide by Periplus books. His photographs were also displayed at the Philippine booth during the 1998 and 2004 World Expo. They are also being used by the Philippine Department of Tourism for their WOW Philippines ad campaign.

Over the past several years Scott has aided in the conservation of whale sharks in Donsol, Sorsogon. He contributes photographs to the World Wildlife Fund, which helps in the identification of individual animals found in the area. Scott also gives slide shows during fund-raisers for their different projects and contributes photos for their annual report and calendar. He is a founding member of the Concerned Divers for the Philippines, a non-profit organization that brings awareness to environmental issues affecting the oceans. Some of their projects include coral reef surveys, giant clam seeding, and reef clean-ups. Recently Scott has also been a supporter of Greenpeace (he was invited on-board the Rainbow Warrior and Esperanza) and is also involved with Reef Check. Scott has just recently launched his 4th forth book titled BAHURA – A Passage through Philippine Reefs, a large format picture book shot on location all over the Philippines. Scott is currently working on two books, one on Anilao and the other on Tubbataha reef in conjunction with WWF-Philippines. Scott is a regular contributor to Asian Diver (Singapore), Sport Diving (Australia), Scuba Globe Asia Pacific (Thailand) and Philippine Diver & Thai Diver. He has had over 75 articles and 18 magazine covers published in various magazines from all over the world.


Gunther Deichmann: environmentalist, photographer

Gunther Deichmann is an internationally multi-awarded Australian photographer. Born in Germany on the 25th of April 1951, he spent his early years studying Paleontology. He has and always will love his fossils. At the age of 21, he journeyed to Australia with just one suitcase in hand. He then worked as a geology assistant in the exploration department for a large mining company. This gave Gunther the privilege of traveling throughout the Australian Outback, which to him, is among the most beautiful places on earth. It is nature at its best, and his quest to capture this beauty that led him to photography. In 1974, he became an Australian citizen while in Alice Springs, the very center of Australia, which he remains proud of until today. In 1976 he gave up geology and started his full time career in photography. He started with a small photo laboratory in Darwin, the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia, producing the very first Ciba Chrome prints of this magnificent land. He had his first break with an image of “The Olgas With A Rainbow”. The Olgas is a spectacular land formation some 30 miles from Ayers Rock. Many believe that this was the very first image of the Olgas with an actual rainbow. To get the shot, he patiently watched the clouds waiting for the light to be just right, thus creating this amazing image. This image has won him many awards and been used on numerous international book covers. From then on the rainbows seemed to keep following him around, another first was the “Rainbow over Rainbow Valley”, 60 miles south of Alice Springs.

He preferred to travel during the worst time of the year when temperatures soared in the hope for clouds in the desert, creating images seldom seen before. Even today, Gunther prefers to travel off-season, as in Santorini Greece in 2005. His choice to go in the middle of winter yielded dramatic results. To Gunther, photography is light and light is photography. He loves strong colours and contrast blending it with plenty of drama. He traveled throughout the Northern Territory, creating an immense amount of images and established one of the first stock image librarys in Australia. He later became a member of the Institute of Australian Professional Photography (IAPP) and achieved 14 merit awards in only three years. He was awarded the associateship and had the honour of becoming one of the judges for the yearly Professional Merit Awards. It was during this time that he started to teach photography at the Community College in Darwin. This was welcomed additional income to fund his extensive travels.

In March 1983, Time Magazine used on its cover Gunther's shot of “The Great Australian Dry”. It was his much awaited break. In 1985, the IAAP awarded him the Professional Landscape Photographer of the Year. In 1986, he was named by the Bulletin, an Australia magazine, as one of the leading professional photographers in the country. In that same year, the IAAP requested Gunther to assist renowned New York-based photographer Pete Turner during his visit to Australia. Pete, who at first photographed Ayers Rock, returned a few years later to photograph other great places like the Pinnacles in Western Australia. Gunther and Pete inevitably became good friends and are in touch until today.

The reputable publishing company, Rigby Publishers in Adelaide, South Australia hired Gunther over these years for various book projects which includes: My Territory in 1983, his first major coffee-table book and one of the very first books on the Northern Territory of Australia. In 1984 Norfolk Island and Its People followed. For this he traveled to Tahiti and Pitcairn Island, retracing the steps of the mutineers of the famed Mutiny on the Bounty. In 1985 Australian Natural Wonders came out after eight months of shooting in some of the most remote places in Australia, including two of Australia's largest desserts, the Simpson and Tanami. In 1985 Savvas Publishing, Australia, published his book, The Territory, a 256-page coffee-table book featuring the Northern Territory of Australia. In 1989 Collins Publishers, also in Australia, published his book, Northern Images, his first artistic book, which featured his personal favorite images of the Northern Territory. Beyond books, Gunther's work also appeared in international media. His coverage about the killing of Australian wild horses for the German magazine, Stern, helped stop the practice. The message of his 11-page photo essay in Stern found its way to other publications, and the images of carnage soon were seen worldwide, appearing not only in print but also on television, including CNN. As a result of this, he was invited by the Court for Animal Justice (U.N.) in Geneva, Switzerland, to be the key spokesperson to condemn the killing of horses in an inhumane way. The exposé was followed by similar works on other animals such as wild camels and buffalo.

The Geo Magazine in Germany used his Australian images both for the magazine and for a major calendar production. Airone Magazine in Italy sent Gunther to Nauru and the Philippines for photo assignments. He also covered major stories for Animan Magazine in Switzerland. It published his portfolio in 1990, and then later, his photo essays of the Philippines, the Mekong River in Indochina, the Australian Aborigines, and Australia each featuring spreads from 24 to 26 pages and two covers. Gunther's images have also appeared in other major book productions, including The Racing Game, National Geographic, Time-Life, Reader's Digest, BBC (London), and in magazines such as the cover of Der Spiegel (Germany), Bunte (cover), National Magazine (South Africa), National Geographic , New York Times (USA), Sued Deutsche Zeitung (Germany), Grand Reportage (France), VSD (France), GEO (France), Terre Savage (France), and Figaro (France). He was featured in a documentary titled Visions in the Making, which was broadcast on ABC ( Australia ). Of the four Australian artists featured, he was the only still photographer.

1982 to 1985 - He has won an impressive 14 merit awards from the Australian Institute of Professional Photography (IAAP). 1985 - Australian Professional Landscape Photographer of the Year. 1986 - A collection of Gunther Deichmann's photographs in an Australian tourist promotion won for its publishers a unique clean sweep of prizes in its category at the International Travel Awards - first prize for Best Domestic Brochure, first prize for Best International Brochure and the National Tourism Award. 1986 - One of Gunther Deichmann's photographs was used in an advertising campaign that won awards at the Art Directors Club in Melbourne, Australia. 1987 - The NT Press Club Annual Media Awards in Australia awarded Gunther Deichmann the ‘Pictorial Excellence Award'. He also received the ‘Sheraton Award' for pictorial promotion of tourism in the Northern Territory. A photo-essay for Thai International Airlines won him a PATA category award, and he has been on the PATA Gold Awards Honors Roll in Osaka, Japan, since 1987.

In March 2007, Gunther Deichmann received his Apple Training Certification for Aperture.  Gunther still travels throughout Asia and Micronesia covering remote places in the region. Every year he chooses new destinations to capture images, if only for his own personal satisfaction. An Australian by heart, he dreams of returning one day for a six-month shoot, visiting again the place he loves so much—the Great Australian outback, which inspired and challenged him to make the great shift from Paleontology to Photography.


Frederic Buyle – 5 times world champion free dive/underwater photographer : 2007

Frederic was born in 1972. Spending several months a year on the family's sailboat since his early years, he has always been in contact with the sea. At the age of 10, he discovers free diving.  After some years of practice, he turned to scuba diving for a while and became a Padi and Cmas scuba diving instructor. He starts to teach free diving in 1991. Two years after completing publicity and communication studies, he set his 1st world record in 1995 and decided to dedicate his life to free diving and began to travel the world. He achieved two more world records in 1997 and 1999.

The same year, Frederic passed the100m's mythical barrier in breath hold diving. He was the 8th person in the world to do so. In 2000, he set his last world record.Since then, Frederic keeps on traveling to free dive and teach free diving all over the world. In 2002, he started underwater photography to be able to show the beauty of free diving and the underwater world to the wider audience.

Frederic comes from an artistic background. His grand grand father was a photography’s pioneer in the 1890’ and art collector, his grand father a painter and his father has been an commercial and fashion photographer during the 60’. His work shows these various influences. All his pictures are taken in freediving action.  To take his pictures, Fred uses a simple formula: the water, available light, a camera, and one breath of air. A free diver is able to capture unique moments thanks to his simple equipment and ease of movement. Frederic has been taking pictures down to 60m on a single breath on remote locations where scuba divers can’t access.  Fred uses the same method for his uw video work.

Published in Apnea, Chocs, Diver, Diver Japan,Dyking, L'Equipe Magazine, Focus, Hawaii Skin Diver, Holland Herald (klm inflight mag), Melange, Men’s Health, National Geographic, New Look, Nice Matin, Océans, Plongeurs International, Thalassa, Times Tavel Magazine amongst others.

Corporate: IWC Shaffausen watches, Hamilton Watches, Red Bull, Tahiti Tourisme, Instruments & Mesures du Temps watches.  In 2006 Fred together with Emma Farrell released “One breath, A Reflection on Freedivng”, Pynto publishing, UK. Fred is working closely with the Malpelo Foundation for hammerhead and odontaspis ferox shark tagging programs.


Ferdie Marcelo – environmentalist, Seacology

Ferdie Marcelo is the Seacology Field Representative for the Philippines. Prior to joining Seacology, Ferdie worked for six years for the Philippine Senate where he often backstopped for the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources, as well as the Committee on Education. He was also involved with the Technical Working Group that drafted the Solid Waste Management Act, and the Medium-Term Higher Education Development and Investment Plan.

An avid scuba diver since being certified in 1985, Ferdie eventually earned his NAUI instructor rating in 1991.  Working as a free-lance divemaster and instructor enabled him to dive in many places all over the Philippines.  Ferdie’s CTS presentation will focus on Seacology’s win-win projects in the Philippines. Seacology is an international ngo with the sole purpose of preserving the environments and cultures of islands throughout the world.  Seacology does this by giving villagers a tangible incentive they request such as a school, community center or fresh water delivery system in exchange for establishing a marine or forest reserve.

Lynn Funkhouser – underwater photographer

Lynn Funkhouser was inducted into the inaugural Women Divers Hall of Fame. She is an internationally published photographer, author, lecturer, environmentalist, adventuress, and leader in dive travel. She specializes in underwater, nature, travel, and environmental images. Lynn's dramatic photos have been published in calendars, ads, and major magazines, notably in "Audubon," "Animals," "Action Asia," "International Wildlife," "Time," "Newsweek" and "National Geographic" Publications, etc. She also has exhibited her work in many galleries.

As an environmentalist, Lynn is committed to making a difference on this planet through her images and lectures. One of the founders of the International Marinelife Alliance (IMA) in 1985, Lynn serves on the Board of Directors. Lynn was honored to receive the 1994 SEASPACE / PADI Environmental Awareness Award which recognizes outstanding effort in the cause of marine conservation and education "for her continuing efforts promoting reef preservation in the Philippines and around the world." She also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Philippine Aquatic and Marinelife Conservationists' Association, Inc. (PAMARCON) for "her outstanding contributions on behalf of the conservation and preservation of the marine environment of the Philippines."

She is an expert on diving in the Philippine Islands spending 2 months every year since 1976 diving 250 islands. She was a special consultant to the John G. Shedd Aquarium for the 15,000 square. ft. building. addition, "Wild Reef" featuring Apo Island, Philippines, which opened in 2003. She leads several dive trips a year to the Philippines. She was also a special consultant to the Smithsonian Institution on Shells and Ocean Planet, 1995. She served as the photographer on the research project - Shiraho Coral Reef & the Proposed New lshigaki Island Airport, Japan, with a review of the status of the coral reefs of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, prepared by the International Marinelife Alliance Canada for Species Survival Commission and the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, Switzerland, which saved Shiraho's 600 year old blue coral reef from becoming an airport. It was the first environmental research study to stop a Japanese project.

Filemon G. Romero, Project Manager, WWF Philippines

Prof. Filemon G. Romero is a candidate for a Ph.D. in Environmental Science at the University of the Philippines in Diliman and he is about to defend his paper on the Population Structure of Blue Crabs, Portunus pelagicus in the Visayan Sea.  He has a Masters degree in Physical Oceanography from the same university.  He has been a faculty member of the Mindanao State University Tawi-Tawi College of Technology and Oceanography since 1971 where he rose in faculty rank as well as administrative functions until he became Chancellor in 1989 to 1994.

He joined WWF Philippines in 1996 where he served as Director of the Oceans and Coasts Program. His engagement with WWF gave him extensive experience in administration and implementation of projects in marine protected areas (MPAs), biodiversity conservation, Integrated Conservation and Development Projects (ICDP) and Coastal Resources Management (CRM) and Integrated Coastal Management (ICM).  This also gave him a lot of opportunity to travel to various part of the world.  He has co-authored the Coral Reef Education for Students and Teachers (CREST) and has published 14 papers.


Peter Scoones (UK), cinematographer BBC –  2009

Film Credits:
"The Blue Planet" (camera operator) (1 episode, 2001)
Ocean World (2001) TV episode
Amazing Earth (1998) (TV)
"Life in the Freezer" (camera team)
Footsteps in the Snow (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Door Closes (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Race to Breed (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Ice Retreats (1993) TV episode (camera team)
The Bountiful Sea (1993) TV episode (camera team)

Nature" (2 episodes, 2003-2007)
Voyage of the Lonely Turtle (2007) TV episode
White Shark/Red Triangle (2003) TV episode
Galápagos (2007) (TV)
The Making of 'Deep Blue' (2006) (V)
"Wild Indonesia" (3 episodes, 1999)
Creatures of Island Kingdoms (1999) TV episode
The Mystery of Sulawesi (1999) TV episode
Where Worlds Collide (1999) TV episode
Great White Shark (1995) (TV)
"Sea Trek" (1991) (mini) TV mini-series
"The Trials of Life" (2 episodes, 1990)
Continuing the Line (1990) TV episode
Talking to Strangers (1990) TV episode
"The Living Planet" (1 episode, 1984)
The Open Ocean (1984) TV episode
"Life on Earth" (1 episode, 1979)
 Invasion of the Land (1979) TV episode

When Peter Scoones was serving in the Royal Air Force in the Far East in the early 1960’s the shops only stocked facemasks. He bought one so he could more easily see to scrub the hull of his racing dinghy. However, one glimpse of the colourful fish and scenery below was sufficient to arouse a passion that has taken him to the highest ranks of the world’s most highly regarded wildlife underwater cameramen.

He trained as a naval architect but, when he was due to be called up for National Service, instead decided to sign up for the RAF and “let them teach me something useful”. That was photography and he learned to use and repair everything from 35mm to 5in x 4in film cameras as well as cine models. He also did everything from pack shots and portraits to air-to-air photography.

At the same time he made housings in Perspex so he could take his photography underwater and soon began to produce results that went on to win gold medals at international film festivals. At the same time, he and his friends formed their own diving club, devised training programmes and taught themselves to dive with the assistance of the local Royal Navy unit.

At the end of his time in the RAF Peter returned to the UK and began working in the photographic trade as colour manager of a Fleet Street processing laboratory. That was when he met Colin Doeg and together, in 1967, they formed the British Society of Underwater Photographers.

The Society’s first splash-ins were at Shoreham and Swanage, on the south coast. Later they moved to Fort Bovisand at Plymouth and the on-the-day shoot-out format that Peter devised is now the basis of competitions throughout the world, including the CMAS world title event. Led by Peter, some of the members used to process the day’s films in the dungeons at the Fort and the audience voted for their favourite images, a practice adopted by BsoUP to overcome the fierce controversies that usually followed judges’ decisions at contests.
                      
Peter moved on to join a company that made housings and underwater cameras for the oil industry as well as providing film and photographic services. He used to amaze his friends with his ability to return from an assignment in tropical waters one day and be packed and ready to fly to Aberdeen the next morning to work on a North Sea oil rig.

While he was working for that company he had his big break. The BBC heard that he had developed a special low light television camera and wanted to hire it for an expedition to the Comoros to film coelacanths, the oldest fish in the world. Peter said the camera was only available if he came along to operate it … and that is how he first met David Attenborough, who is instantly recognisable throughout the world as the voice and face of wildlife films.

The method of controlling the camera was crude. It was dangled deep in the ocean at the end of a steel hawser that was raised, lowered and twisted to direct it. Eventually the camera met its fate when it was trapped in a gully and torn adrift from the hawser but the expedition led to a continuing involvement with the BBC’s Natural History Unit and strings of awards for the films and videos for which his work was a major or total part.

In the process he has dived everywhere from the tropics to beneath the ice. He knows the world’s oceans like most people know their own garden or street. He is the only person to have been awarded the title of British Underwater Photographer of the Year twice.


Dr Phil Nyutten : 2005 : 2009

Dr. Phil Nuytten has spent his life in subsea exploration. He has logged many thousands of hours underwater world-wide as a working commercial diver and as a developer of underwater equipment and techniques. He is widely regarded as one of the pioneers of the modern commercial diving industry and a significant force in the creation of new technology.  In the 1960's and 70's, Nuytten was heavily involved in experimental deep-diving and the development of mixed gas decompression tables. In 1968 he was a member of the team that completed the first 600 foot ocean ‘bounce’ dives on ‘Project Nesco’, and in 1972 he wrote the protocol for ‘Deep Work 1000’, the first North American thousand foot saturation dive. These early projects helped set the international standards in use today. During this period, Phil Nuytten co-founded Oceaneering International Inc. Oceaneering International pioneered many early subsea development projects, and has gone on to become one of the largest underwater skills companies in the world.

In the 1970’s, working with long-time colleague Dr. Joe MacInnis, Nuytten headed the equipment research component of a series of high-arctic expeditions. Among the goals of these expeditions was the testing of his own designs of life-support gear for use in polar and sub-polar conditions. In 1984, Phil Nuytten appeared on the cover of National Geographic Magazine for his record dives through ice-covered arctic waters onto the ‘Breadalbane’, the northern-most known shipwreck. His involvement in underwater activities in virtually all of the world’s oceans has resulted in articles on his work in Reader’s Digest, Business Week, Newsweek, Time, Popular Science, Discovery, Fortune, and Scientific American, as well as dozens of dozens of diving and aerospace technical journals. Nuytten is a popular speaker at underwater conferences around the world and has published numerous technical papers on his leading-edge work in subsea technology.

Dr. Phil Nuytten has been instrumental in the development and current acceptance of Atmospheric Diving System technology. In 1979, he began work on a revolutionary new one-atmosphere diving suit that resulted in a patented break-through in rotary joint design, and formed the basis for the world-famous ‘Newtsuit’. The ‘Newtsuit’ is a thousand foot-rated hard suit that completely protects the wearer from outside pressure and eliminates the need for decompression while still maintaining mobility and dexterity – a “submarine that you wear”. It is now standard equipment in many of the world’s navies.

In1997, Nuytten and his design team produced the two thousand foot-rated micro-submersible ‘DeepWorker 2000’: a revolutionary deep-diving system that has been called an “underwater sports car”. Nuytten and Nuytco Research Ltd. received a five year contract from the National Geographic Society to provide DeepWorker 2000 submersibles and crews on Dr. Sylvia Earle’s ‘Sustainable Seas Expeditions’: an initiative to study deep ocean environmental impact. The use of the DeepWorker micro-subs to explore and monitor National marine sanctuaries has already increased scientists’ understanding of underwater ecology, habitats, and biodiversity.

In 1999, NASA contracted a pair of DeepWorkers to study their possible use in the recovery of the Space Shuttle booster rockets, and in 2000 DeepWorkers successfully recovered the Space Shuttle booster rockets from the May flight to the U.S. Space Station. NASA is currently studying acquisition of a pair of titanium Deepworkers specifically dedicated to booster rocket recovery. Nuytten’s work with NASA spans more than twenty-five years, and he has published several papers on space applications of undersea technology. He is also a senior member of the American Association of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a life member of the American Association of Underwater Scientists.

Also in the year 2000, Nuytten introduced a new concept for an ultra light weight, swimming, hard suit called the ‘Exosuit’. Nuytten and his team recently completed a contract for the Canadian Department of National Defence to examine the feasibility of using the Exosuit as a submarine escape device. The Beta prototype of the Exosuit underwent swim testing in 2005 and target date for release is 2006. Plans to utilize a space version of the Exosuit are under discussion and Nuytten and his team are currently training astronauts from the Canadian Space Agency as pilots of the DeepWorker 2000 submersibles.

In 2003, Nuytten and his design team completed the first side-by-side Dual DeepWorker, designed for a pilot and one observer. Designed with the use of deep-depth underwater tourism in mind, this 2000’ rated submersible has commercial and scientific applications as well. Dr. Phil Nuytten has earned many international honours and awards. These include commercial diving’s highest award from the Association of Diving Contractors International, the Academy of Underwater Art and Sciences ‘Nogi’ award, induction into the ‘Diving Hall of Fame’, and the Explorer’s Club’s prestigious ‘Lowell Thomas’ Award. In 1992, Nuytten was awarded the Order of British Columbia, his home province’s highest honour, in recognition of his role in making British Columbia one of the world centres of underwater technology.

His outstanding Canadian achievements were recognized again in 2000 when he received the Canadian Underwater Pioneer Award. In 2001 Nuytten received the Jules Verne Award in Paris for his international accomplishments in the subsea field. Dr. Phil Nuytten has spent nearly forty years to developing undersea systems that have the safety of the diving technician as their common theme. His goal has been to provide scientific, technical, military, and sport divers full access to continental shelf depths without the hazards of decompression, so that humans can explore, learn about and - ultimately - protect the world’s oceans.



Mike Valentine: www.valentinefilms.com

Filmography
Basic Instinct 2: Risk Addiction - ( Director of Photography((Underwater Unit)) / 2006 / Released / )
Basic Instinct 2: Risk Addiction - ( Camera Operator((Underwater Unit)) / 2006 / Released / )
Casino Royale - ( Photography(- Underwater Photography) / 2006 / Released / )
Eragon - ( Director of Photography((Underwater Unit)) / 2006 / Released / 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment )
The Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy - ( Camera Operator(- Underwater Cameraman (2nd Unit)) / 2005 / Released / )
The Bourne Supremacy - ( Director of Photography / 2004 / Released / )
Young Adam - ( Camera Operator(- Underwater Cameraman) / 2004 / Released / Odeon Productions (Greece) )
Shanghai Knights - ( Second Unit Director / 2003 / Released / )
Die Another Day - ( Photography(- Underwater Photography) / 2002 / Released / )
The Hours - ( Camera Operator(- Underwater Camera Operator) / 2002 / Released / )
Sexy Beast - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 2001 / Released / )
The Man Who Cried - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 2001 / Released / )
Love's Labour's Lost - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 2000 / Released / )
Next Friday - ( Electrician / 2000 / Released / )
The Beach - ( Director of Photography / 2000 / Released / )
Entrapment - ( Camera(- cameraman) / 1999 / Released / )
The World Is Not Enough - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1999 / Released / )
Firelight - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 1998 / Released / Village Roadshow Pictures Worldwide )
My Giant - ( Director of Photography(- underwater director of photography/underwater camera operator) / 1998 / Released / )
Shakespeare in Love - ( Camera(- underwater unit coordinator & cameraman (2nd Unit)) / 1998 / Released / )
Vigo - Passion for Life - ( Camera(- underwater camera) / 1998 / Released / )
Intimate Relations - ( Photography(- underwater photographer) / 1997 / Released / CFP Distribution
The End of Violence - ( Other(- lamp operator) / 1997 / Released / Globe )
Twin Town - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman (2nd Unit)) / 1997 / Released / )
Loch Ness - ( Director of Photography / 1996 / Released / REP )
Trainspotting - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 1996 / Released / BVI Group )
Funny Bones - ( Camera Operator(- underwater camera operator) / 1995 / Released / )
Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book - ( Camera(- underwater camera (2nd Unit)) / 1994 / Released / Gaga Entertainment )
Splitting Heirs - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 1993 / Released / )
Waterland - ( Camera(- underwater cameraman) / 1992 / Released / Alliance Releasing )
Crossing the Line - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1991 / Released / Cineplex Odeon )
Killing Dad - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1989 / Released / )
Leviathan - ( Camera Operator(- underwater camera operator) / 1989 / Released / )
The Fruit Machine - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1989 / Released / )
Vanille Fraise - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1989 / Released / Excelsior Films )
Track 29 - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1988 / Released / )
Castaway - ( Photography(- underwater photography) / 1987 / Released / Screen Entertainment Distributors Ltd )


SCOTT  TUASON   : 2007, 2008, 2009

Scott started Scuba diving at the age of eleven in 1979. At that time he was diving without a license and had to wait until he was thirteen to get his first real formal training. By the time he was fifteen he was an advanced open water diver, and for his birthday Scott’s father gave him his first underwater camera. It was a Nikonos 5 w a 35mm lens. For many years of trail and error he used that camera to transform what he saw underwater to pictures. Most of the time with very poor results, however he knew by now that underwater photography was not something that could be learnt overnight. Scott went to college in 1986 at the University of Tampa with the hopes of getting a degree in marine biology. He never finished his marine – bio degree, instead he got a B.S. in economics and a minor in art (photography).  It was in those classes where he started to learn, not so much the technical aspects of photography but the art of seeing things.

Scott has been diving for 27 years and taking underwater pictures for 20 years. In 1990 he got an Open Water Instructor rating from PADI. Today Scott has logged over 4000 dives. He has dived all over the Philippines with the exception of the northern tip of Luzon and the eastern side of the Visayas and Mindanao. Outside of the Philippines, Scott has been fortunate enough to dive Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Maldives, Thailand, Myanmar, Vietnam, Papua New Guinea, Palau & Yap, Florida, Jamaica, Mexico, Bahamas and the Cayman Islands. Scott has just recently fulfilled his dream of diving with Great White sharks off the coast of Mexico.  Some of his favorite sites include Anilao, Batangas for macro photography and the Sulu Sea for wide-angle shots. He contributes regularly to Asian Diver, Sport Diving Australia, Scuba Globe Asia Pacific and Action Asia, including their “Adventure guide to the Philippines”. Scott has 3 coffee table books one entitled “The Philippine Coral Reefs in Watercolor”.  This book was done together with painter, Rafael Cusi. The other a large format picture book on the marine animals of Anilao, co-authored with Eduardo Cu Unjieng. The Anilao book won an award for photography at the 19th Philippine National book awards and the World grand prize for underwater image books at the 27th World Festival of Underwater Images in Antibes, France in the year 2000. As well in 2000 his photo of Mating Mandarin fish won first place at the Los Angeles Underwater Photographic Society’s international competition in the digital print category. His Turtle shot was runner-up in the Wide Angle print category and a Grey reef shark photo was honorable mention in the same category. His photos also placed 2nd in the WOW Philippines contest for both underwater and topside category. Scott’s 3rd book entitled The Ultimate Orient Philippine South Sea Pearls was published in March 2002; it is the story of the pearl told in pictures. He was commissioned by Jewelmer International to shoot the book, which was a corporate gift to their preferred clients. Scott was also a major contributor to the recently published South East Asia Diving Guide by Periplus books. His photographs were also displayed at the Philippine booth during the 1998 and 2004 World Expo. They are also being used by the Philippine Department of Tourism for their WOW Philippines ad campaign.

Over the past several years Scott has aided in the conservation of whale sharks in Donsol, Sorsogon. He contributes photographs to the World Wildlife Fund, which helps in the identification of individual animals found in the area. Scott also gives slide shows during fund-raisers for their different projects and contributes photos for their annual report and calendar. He is a founding member of the Concerned Divers for the Philippines, a non-profit organization that brings awareness to environmental issues affecting the oceans. Some of their projects include coral reef surveys, giant clam seeding, and reef clean-ups. Recently Scott has also been a supporter of Greenpeace (he was invited on-board the Rainbow Warrior and Esperanza) and is also involved with Reef Check. Scott has just recently launched his 4th forth book titled BAHURA – A Passage through Philippine Reefs, a large format picture book shot on location all over the Philippines. Scott is currently working on two books, one on Anilao and the other on Tubbataha reef in conjunction with WWF-Philippines. Scott is a regular contributor to Asian Diver (Singapore), Sport Diving (Australia), Scuba Globe Asia Pacific (Thailand) and Philippine Diver & Thai Diver. He has had over 75 articles and 18 magazine covers published in various magazines from all over the world. Some of them include Sport Diver (UK), Skin Diver (USA),Ocean Realm(USA), Action Asia(HK),Dykking(Norway),Plongeurs(France),Hors Ligne(Switzerland),Fathoms (USA) & Scuba Diver Australasia (Australia)


Gunther Deichmann: www.Deichmann-photo.com : 2007

Gunther Deichmann is an internationally multi-awarded Australian photographer. Born in Germany on the 25th of April 1951, he spent his early years studying Paleontology. He has and always will love his fossils. At the age of 21, he journeyed to Australia with just one suitcase in hand. He then worked as a geology assistant in the exploration department for a large mining company. This gave Gunther the privilege of traveling throughout the Australian Outback, which to him, is among the most beautiful places on earth. It is nature at its best, and his quest to capture this beauty that led him to photography. In 1974, he became an Australian citizen while in Alice Springs, the very center of Australia, which he remains proud of until today. In 1976 he gave up geology and started his full time career in photography. He started with a small photo laboratory in Darwin, the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia, producing the very first Ciba Chrome prints of this magnificent land. He had his first break with an image of “The Olgas With A Rainbow”. The Olgas is a spectacular land formation some 30 miles from Ayers Rock. Many believe that this was the very first image of the Olgas with an actual rainbow. To get the shot, he patiently watched the clouds waiting for the light to be just right, thus creating this amazing image. This image has won him many awards and been used on numerous international book covers. From then on the rainbows seemed to keep following him around, another first was the “Rainbow over Rainbow Valley”, 60 miles south of Alice Springs.

He preferred to travel during the worst time of the year when temperatures soared in the hope for clouds in the desert, creating images seldom seen before. Even today, Gunther prefers to travel off-season, as in Santorini Greece in 2005. His choice to go in the middle of winter yielded dramatic results. To Gunther, photography is light and light is photography. He loves strong colours and contrast blending it with plenty of drama. He traveled throughout the Northern Territory, creating an immense amount of images and established one of the first stock image librarys in Australia. He later became a member of the Institute of Australian Professional Photography (IAPP) and achieved 14 merit awards in only three years. He was awarded the associateship and had the honour of becoming one of the judges for the yearly Professional Merit Awards. It was during this time that he started to teach photography at the Community College in Darwin. This was welcomed additional income to fund his extensive travels.

In March 1983, Time Magazine used on its cover Gunther's shot of “The Great Australian Dry”. It was his much awaited break. In 1985, the IAAP awarded him the Professional Landscape Photographer of the Year. In 1986, he was named by the Bulletin, an Australia magazine, as one of the leading professional photographers in the country. In that same year, the IAAP requested Gunther to assist renowned New York-based photographer Pete Turner during his visit to Australia. Pete, who at first photographed Ayers Rock, returned a few years later to photograph other great places like the Pinnacles in Western Australia. Gunther and Pete inevitably became good friends and are in touch until today.

The reputable publishing company, Rigby Publishers in Adelaide, South Australia hired Gunther over these years for various book projects which includes: My Territory in 1983, his first major coffee-table book and one of the very first books on the Northern Territory of Australia. In 1984 Norfolk Island and Its People followed. For this he traveled to Tahiti and Pitcairn Island, retracing the steps of the mutineers of the famed Mutiny on the Bounty. In 1985 Australian Natural Wonders came out after eight months of shooting in some of the most remote places in Australia, including two of Australia's largest desserts, the Simpson and Tanami. In 1985 Savvas Publishing, Australia, published his book, The Territory, a 256-page coffee-table book featuring the Northern Territory of Australia. In 1989 Collins Publishers, also in Australia, published his book, Northern Images, his first artistic book, which featured his personal favorite images of the Northern Territory. Beyond books, Gunther's work also appeared in international media. His coverage about the killing of Australian wild horses for the German magazine, Stern, helped stop the practice. The message of his 11-page photo essay in Stern found its way to other publications, and the images of carnage soon were seen worldwide, appearing not only in print but also on television, including CNN. As a result of this, he was invited by the Court for Animal Justice (U.N.) in Geneva, Switzerland, to be the key spokesperson to condemn the killing of horses in an inhumane way. The exposé was followed by similar works on other animals such as wild camels and buffalo.

The Geo Magazine in Germany used his Australian images both for the magazine and for a major calendar production. Airone Magazine in Italy sent Gunther to Nauru and the Philippines for photo assignments. He also covered major stories for Animan Magazine in Switzerland. It published his portfolio in 1990, and then later, his photo essays of the Philippines, the Mekong River in Indochina, the Australian Aborigines, and Australia each featuring spreads from 24 to 26 pages and two covers. Gunther's images have also appeared in other major book productions, including The Racing Game, National Geographic, Time-Life, Reader's Digest, BBC (London), and in magazines such as the cover of Der Spiegel (Germany), Bunte (cover), National Magazine (South Africa), National Geographic , New York Times (USA), Sued Deutsche Zeitung (Germany), Grand Reportage (France), VSD (France), GEO (France), Terre Savage (France), and Figaro (France). He was featured in a documentary titled Visions in the Making, which was broadcast on ABC ( Australia ). Of the four Australian artists featured, he was the only still photographer.

1982 to 1985 - He has won an impressive 14 merit awards from the Australian Institute of Professional Photography (IAAP). 1985 - Australian Professional Landscape Photographer of the Year. 1986 - A collection of Gunther Deichmann's photographs in an Australian tourist promotion won for its publishers a unique clean sweep of prizes in its category at the International Travel Awards - first prize for Best Domestic Brochure, first prize for Best International Brochure and the National Tourism Award. 1986 - One of Gunther Deichmann's photographs was used in an advertising campaign that won awards at the Art Directors Club in Melbourne, Australia. 1987 - The NT Press Club Annual Media Awards in Australia awarded Gunther Deichmann the ‘Pictorial Excellence Award'. He also received the ‘Sheraton Award' for pictorial promotion of tourism in the Northern Territory. A photo-essay for Thai International Airlines won him a PATA category award, and he has been on the PATA Gold Awards Honors Roll in Osaka, Japan, since 1987.

Gunther rocks, too! In 1989 the Australian rock band, Midnight Oil, used one of his images for the cover of their album, “Blue Sky Mining” . Other highlights of his career include writing and directing the music video for the English band Electronic (Warner Bros., USA ) in 1991. Also, the first 35mm MTV production in the Philippines of the single “Get the Message”, which enjoyed top ratings on international music charts. He has also excelled in advertising. In 1994, Seiko used his work in its worldwide television and print advertising campaigns for Kinetic watches. Gunther and his family are now based in Manila Philippines. It is from here where he covers Southeast Asia and the Pacific. He held a photo exhibit at the Australian Embassy in Manila in 1997. He has since also set up Dream Time, which specializes in tourism, environmental issues and underwater projects. In 2000, Dream Time published his book, The Dive Sites of Puerto Galera, Philippines, a guide book on diving and marine environs, with text by Frank Doyle. Its revised edition came out in 2004. In 2001, he published his book on Palau, Micronesia, with marine photographers Kevin Davidson, Ethan Daniels and text by Gunther Taus. In 2002, Gunther, who is Dream Time's Creative Director, together with Rene Olbes organized and produced new advertising collaterals for the Palau Visitors Authority earning the company honorable mention during the 2002 international PATA Conference. In 2006, the German publishing group, ARAKI, used on the cover of the book Die letzten Nomaden his image of the “The Olgas With A Rainbow” - indeed proof of the timeless value of this 30 year old photograph.

In March 2007, Gunther Deichmann received his Apple Training Certification for Aperture.  Gunther still travels throughout Asia and Micronesia covering remote places in the region. Every year he chooses new destinations to capture images, if only for his own personal satisfaction. An Australian by heart, he dreams of returning one day for a six-month shoot, visiting again the place he loves so much—the Great Australian outback, which inspired and challenged him to make the great shift from Paleontology to Photography.

Philippe Poppe

As a young boy, Philippe made his first dive at the age of 10 offshore Marseille, France and was fascinated at once by the marine world. After his studies which included graphics, he became a marketing specialist in one of the world's largest Internet companies. Philippe was always fascinated by computer technologies, photography and nature, and he accompanied his father on many trips worldwide which allowed him to dive in many remote and exotic places.  For years, Philippe collaborated in the publishing of books authored by Poppe & Goto and the more recent series "A Conchological Iconography". With over 650 dives during the last 4 years, he has had many opportunities in discovering the Philippine fauna and some of its rarest creatures. Currently Philippe and Guido Poppe maintain www.poppe-images.com a website dedicated to the Philippine Fauna with over 37,000 pictures.

Stuart Green

Stuart Green is a Coastal Resource Management Specialist with extensive experience of developing marine management and tourism products. He holds a BSc in Applied Biology from the Hull International Fisheries Institute, University of Hull, and an MSc in Integrated Coastal Zone Management form the University of Ulster. He has over 10 years experience in community-based coastal resource management projects in The Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam and Malaysia. Stuart’s particular area of interest is the establishment of community-based Marine Protected Areas, with special emphasis on appropriate training, capability building and establishment of user fees. He has written extensively economic development and conservation in coastal areas and participated in and/or facilitated a substantial number of regional and international conferences and workshops.


Jennifer Hayes

Jen Hayes is an aquatic ecologist who has collected a couple of graduate degrees in zoology, marine and fisheries biology. Jen taught undergraduate marine biology, evolution and fisheries biology and engaged a 7 year research program to determine the population dynamics of sturgeons.  She who came into underwater journalism (photography and writing) out of sheer necessity to enliven dull scientific presentations and publications. To put it simply, strong images of ancient sturgeons spawning, hatching, migrating are infinitely more captivating to an audience than bar graphs and pie charts. Photography and science lead to natural history articles and then into popular journalism.  Jen’s images and words have appeared in several publications including Geo, Terre Sauvage, DIVE,  Sports Illustrated, Stern, National Geographic Magazine, National Geographic Traveler and The Best of National Geographic, Science and Sport Diver where she is a feature contributor. Her contract advertising clients include Mercedes Benz and Rolex Watch Company. Her stock photography is represented by Undersea Images Inc. and National Geographic. Jen formed a partnership with David Doubilet in 1999 and co-founded the stock photo company Undersea Images Inc. Jen and David co-photograph and write for assignment features for numerous domestic and international publications, ad shoots and book projects.


John Boyle, 2006

John started diving back in 1971 when he was 17 and made his first film in 1990 since when he has produced around twenty underwater documentary films that have sold to television stations worldwide and won dozens of International awards. He is author of “A step by step guide to underwater video” – recognized as the definitive book on this subject.

His "critters" trilogy filmed during thousands of hours diving in Indonesia's Lembeh Strait has won multiple international awards worldwide including the unprecedented accolade of a double Palme d'Or at the Antibes festival. Two brand new films have been released in 2005 and are available both on DVD and for television - "Ocean Weirdos" - a collaboration with BBC news correspondent John McIntyre - and "Jungle Blue", a documentary about the discovery of a previously unknown cave system in a blue hole deep in the jungle in Papua New Guinea. John is a trustee of The Shark Trust, and a regular guest presenter at film festivals worldwide.



Ron Taylor & Valerie Taylor, 2006 : 2013

Ron began skindiving in 1952 and Valerie was hot on his tail, venturing underwater in 1956. Since this first visit underwater the couple have tirelessly captured the beauty of the underwater on film with their first major underwater film production ‘Shark Hunters’, shot in black and white in 1963. Valerie took up underwater photography in 1969 using underwater housings built by Ron, which were far ahead of their time. The Taylor’s went on to specialize in producing spectacular underwater action on film, their footage used on Jaws, Orca, The Blue Lagoon and the Island of Dr. Moreau.

Diving all over the world, Ron and Valerie have become accustomed to being pioneers, being the first husband and wife team to be awarded a NOGI from the Underwater Society of America, the first divers to use chain mail when interacting with sharks, the first people to discover the now famous Cod Hole on the Barrier Reef and the first divers to film Great White Sharks underwater without a cage by using their electronic shark repelling barrier in South Africa.

But being a pioneer does not come without responsibility, Valerie and Ron taking a leading role in marine conservation. The Taylor’s are responsible for making the taking of fish while on scuba illegal in Australia and both fought the Queensland Government and National Parks to have the rare Potato Cod of Cormorant Bass on the Barrier Reef protected from harvesting.  As a result of their battles both the sea lion and Grey Nurse Shark are protected in NSW and nationally.

Ron and Valerie have won an impressive array of awards for their documentaries, feature films and books. Included in this list is Valerie’s honouree position in the American Women Divers Hall of Fame, Australian Senior Achiever of the Year and Australian Conservationist of the Year. Ron became a Member in the Order of Australia in 2003 and the pair were one of the inaugural enshrines into the International Scuba Diving Hall of Fame on the Cayman Islands. The Taylor’s latest series of three-one-hour shows ‘In the Shadow of the Shark’ is the story of their incredible diving lives.


Carden Wallace PhD : 2003, 2013

Discoverer and Taxonomist,
Principal Scientist - Museum of Tropical Queensland
Hundreds of features and TV documentaries have been produced about the mass coral-spawning event on the Great Barrier Reef and around the world. Millions of divers, photographers and naturalists are aware of this annual natural phenomenon, but very few know the discoverer of this very important biological process. The first to climb Mt Everest and the first to reach the South Pole are insignificant to mankind compared to the discovery of the coral spawning process that contributes immensely to monitoring of the health of our ocean, upon which all inhabitants on earth are dependent.                       

Carden Wallace of Townsville, is the unknown “Hilary and Edmondson” of coral research.  In 1981, Dr. Wallace and her research team became the first in the world to discover and document the coral mass spawning behavior at Magnetic Island, Queensland Australia.  Subsequently in 1992, her team was awarded the Eureka prize for discovery and subsequent research on the coral mass-spawning event.  This prestigious award is only bequeathed for research in any field of the biological, physical, mathematical or biomedical sciences leading to the resolution of an environmental problem and the improvement of our natural environment. The two essential criteria for such recognition are scientific excellence and some manifest that benefits the natural world.  Dr. Wallace remained the quiet achiever; fame and fortune have eluded this demure, soft-spoken coral queen from Queensland, Australia.

Born in Brisbane, Carden Wallace acquired her PHD in zoology from the University of Queensland in 1979 and subsequently became the coral curator at the Queensland Museum, the first of such position in an Australian museum.   In 1987, she moved on to become the Director and Coral curator at the Museum of Tropical Queensland, a position she holds to 2002. Since then she has been researching on every aspect of staghorn corals, their reproduction, ecology and in particular their genetic evolution.  In 1978, she was the first to publish the first review of staghorn corals of the Great Barrier Reef.

About 10 years ago, Dr. Wallace set out on a quest to document the worldwide biogeography of staghorn corals and with the help of 80 friends and colleagues she has now put together the “Worldwide Acropora collection” of some 15,000 specimens in her museum.  She then released a comprehensive volume of the Acropora diversity and distribution, a world first. In the course of her career working on staghorn corals (Acropora species) for 28 years, Dr. Wallace has described many new species such as A. halmaherae, Acropora batunai, A. jacquelineae, A derawanensis, A. walindii, A.awi & A.togainansis.  Most have been named for her close associates or the location the species was first discovered.  

In 1995, Carden was the leading scientist for the Metamorphosea project on the Great Barrier Reef, becoming one of the few that have observed a coral reef continuously for 24 hours. A devoted conservationist, Dr. Wallace is also a Director of OceanNEnvironment, a non-profit organization listed with Environment Australia.  Dr. Wallace is still active in her quest and even in the height of the Timor crisis in September 1999, she lead a band of genetic scientists to the Togian Islands, Indonesia, the Tethyana Expedition to work on the biological diversity and evolution of the islands.  Dr Wallace was distinguished guest and speaker at Ocean NEnvironment Sea Life Festivals in Bali 1998, Exmouth 2002 and Celebrate the Sea Festival 2003 in Kuala Lumpur.

“In my line of work the lens of the microscope magnifies for me the structures that I seek to discover in the staghorn corals. Perhaps I am a little biased, but many would agree that these corals are amongst the most beautiful of all groups of marine organisms. They are the most obvious animals seen by divers, snorkellers and reef walkers on tropical reefs all over the world. Home and shelter to fishes and many marine creatures, they are diverse in structure and colour. They also represent the vulnerability of reefs, because traumatic events – whether they be natural or man-made, show their most obvious effect on these animals.” (Carden Wallace, 1999)

“In many parts of the world I have seen ugly patches on the reef, where fishing bombs have been detonated, or boats dragged, or some source of chronic pollution introduced, or a crown of thorns population has fed and the staghorn corals have been reduced to rubble, or killed as they stand, and overgrown by algal growth, their resident fishes and other creatures dead also or departed. Yet these corals also offer a message of hope, as long as the destructive forces can be reversed, because they can also be the first colonizers that restore a reef to a state of beauty even as it is recovering.”   (Excerpts from a message by Carden Wallace)

Having worked on living corals in many parts of the Indo-Pacific, from the Seychelles and Maldives to French Polynesia, she has recently turned her attention to fossils from Europe and the Caribbean, in order to better understand how these corals evolved and responded to challenging conditions around the world and what their prospects might be for survival into the future.

With her appointment in 1987 as Curator in Charge, Carden Wallace became the first woman to head the Museum of Tropical Queensland in Townsville. Carden began her lifetime journey into the sciences in 1970, with an honours degree in science at the University of Queensland, and a thesis on earthworms. Carden has been the balancing home commitments with long hours of fieldwork since the birth of her two sons between 1974 and 1978.

In 1979 Carden completed a PhD at the University of Queensland, her research still on invertebrates but now directed to tropical marine ecology with a study of soft corals, Acropora. Throughout the period since 1974, Carden's marine science research has been indicated in an extensive list of papers, reports and contributions to significant publications, including ‘A Coral Reef Handbook’, edited by Patricia Mather and Ian Bennett, and ‘Coral Reefs’, edited by L Hammond.

High points in her career include the POL Prize for Environmental Research, awarded in 1992 to Carden along with four other scientists from James Cook University for their exciting discovery of mass annual spawning on the Great Barrier Reef by over a hundred species of coral. Carden's own research has focused on biogeography and biodiversity, particularly on corals and tropical biota. Her current interests are directed towards other tropical countries, especially Indonesia. She feels strongly that scientists should give back all they possibly can, in communicating and applying the results of their work.



Neville Coleman, 2006

At the age of ten, Neville’s most ardent aspirations were to become an explorer. In 1963 he was drawn by a love of nature and an unquenchable thirst for knowledge to conquer his greatest fear – the ocean and its inhabitants. Today Neville has logged over 12 000 dives, is a multi-award winning photographic environmentalist and has been seriously recording the aquatic wildlife of the Asia/Indo-Pacific region for more than forty years.

His Australasian Marine Photographic Index is on of the largest scientifically curated visual identification systems in the Southern Hemisphere. With 54 marine natural history books, around 1000 published magazine articles, audio-visual presentations at over 300 worldwide venues, Neville has introduced millions of people to the wondrous World of Water.

Neville is a fascinating and colourful individual with tremendous passion for life. He has an infectious enthusiasm for his work and has developed - through his experiences and knowledge - a confident understanding of the "dangers" involved. As the first full time professional freelance underwater naturalist/photographer managing to exist in Australia, Neville and his work are part of the pioneering spirit this country was built on.



Michael AW  www.michaelaw.com

Fellow International – The Explorer Club,  www.explorers.org
Fellow – International League of Conservation Photographers, www.ILCP.org

Michael AW saturated colour imageries have earns him more than 61 international awards. In 2010, Outdoor Photography named Michael AW as one of the world’s most influential nature photographer. His essays and images have been featured in BBC Wildlife, National Geographic, the Smithsonian, Nature, Ocean GEOGRAPHIC, Asian Geographic, Nature Focus etc. In 2010 he also won the the prestigious Gold Diver award for the highly contested Portfolio category at the World Festival of Underwater Pictures in France. This is the first time an Asian has won this category. In 2011, Michael is a judge for the BBC Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition – the world’s most prestigious nature photographic competition.

His book “Philippines- Heart of the Ocean”, was awarded the Palme D’or at the world FESTIVAL MONDIAL DE Images Sous Marine in France 2009. He is also a recipient of three awards from the Natural History Museum BBC Photographer of the Year Wildlife Competition in 2000, 2010 and in 2006 he won the Best Winner award in the underwater category.  In 2008 Stan Waterman conferred Michael with the Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Award by Sharks Research Institute in recognition of his highly-effective and unrelenting campaign against shark fin soup consumption in the Asia Pacific region. Michael is also a recipient of the prestigious WYLAND ICON award for Conservation.

Michael is the project director of the Elysium Epic imagery expedition with 57 team members comprising of the world’s best image makers and scientists to document the flora and fauna for a movie and climate change index of the Antarctic Peninsula to South Georgia, following the footstep of Sir Ernest Shackleton 1914-17 Trans Antarctic Expedition.  (www.ElysiumEpic.org) Michael AW is the founder of OceanNEnvironment’s a charity organization registered with Environment Australia. Michael is also the founder of Asian Geographic and Ocean Geographic. www.OceanGeographic.org



Mathieu Meur 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013

Growing up in Mauritius, Mathieu developed a love for the sea at an early age and started photographing the underwater world using disposable cameras in his early teens while snorkeling.  After graduating with a Master of Engineering, he moved to Singapore where he went on to become a part-time dive instructor in addition to his regular job.  Over the past few years, Mathieu has traveled extensively throughout the region for diving, contributed to the training of several hundred divers, conducted seminars and had numerous articles in dive publications in relation to underwater digital photography.  Mathieu also authored a PADI-approved Distinctive Specialty course entitled ‘Underwater Digital Photographer’, which aims at getting people started on the right foot in underwater digital photography.  More recently, Mathieu co-authored “An Essential Guide to Digital Underwater Photography” with Michael Aw


Amos Nachoum 2007

Professional Marine and Wildlife Photographer Amos Nachoum has led National Geographic expedition teams with Dr. Eugenie Clark, Dr. Sylvia Earle, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, and has co-produced documentaries with Stan Waterman. He was the team leader for National Geographic’s Red Sea, Great White Shark, and November ’96 Killer Whale photo expeditions. Mr. Nachoum’s photos and essays have appeared in more than 500 publications in North America, Europe, and Japan, including National Geographic magazine, Ocean Realm, Island, Outside, Rodale’s Scuba Diving, Time, Life, The New York Times, Condé Nast Traveler, Le Figaro, Terra Sauvage, Airone, and Mondo Somerso.

In addition, his work has been included in the books The Living Ocean, Oceans, and The World of Nature. He has been profiled in television appearances on National Geographic Explorer (Sept. ’97), the Today Show, and Good Morning America, as well as in People, Esquire, and Money magazines. In 1988 he won Nikon’s underwater photography contest and in 1993, the Communication Arts Award. He is currently an instructor on the Nikonos team of professional photographers and also conducts his own SLR and advanced u/w photo seminars.

After spending three years circumnavigating the globe, Amos co-founded Israel’s Marine National Park on the Red Sea. In 1978 he established La Mer Diving Seafari Inc, a New York-based adventure-travel company that brought North American divers to some of the most pristine and exotic underwater locations on the planet, from the Galapagos Islands to the Maldives, from Papua New Guinea to Madagascar and the Red Sea. In the course of directing these operations he has become an expert at working in partnership with foreign governments and companies to bring divers to some of the most beautiful and little-visited parts of the underwater realm, with preservation of the environment's integrity foremost in every encounter.

Since 1992, Amos’s efforts have been focused on professional commercial and editorial photography for such clients as the Israeli office of tourism, Saba Island, the governments of Australia, New Zealand, and Brazil, and large private clients ranging from Apple, IBM, and Microsoft to The Discovery Channel, Armani, the Walt Disney corporation, and Colombia Pictures.

Arising from the belief that private individuals should have access to the same sights as governments and large corporations, Amos has developed the cutting-edge adventure-travel program Big Animals Photography Expeditions specifically to provide opportunities to observe, photograph, and interact with the most imposing inhabitants of the sea, such as great white sharks, killer whales, sperm and humpback whales, dolphins, and more. Only through such observation and interaction, Amos Nachoum believes, can people learn to truly understand and respect some of the most impressive citizens of our water planet. Currently, he is working on a coffee table book of his photographs, a series of fine-art lithographs, a CD-ROM, and several television programs.


 

Rod Klein : 2005

Rod Klein is a digital artist, photographer, videographer, web designer, and writer. Earning a Master of Fine Arts Degree in photography and video from UCLA Rod also studied at the prestigious Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. Before becoming a PADI Instructor in 1992, Rod worked in the television industry as an editor, graphics designer, and director. Once he ‘got wet’ doing a resort dive at Club Med, Rod once said to a friend: “I see my future, and it’s underwater!”

Rod has been a dive instructor at Club Med Villages in the Turks & Caicos Islands and Cancun Mexico. He also worked as a dive guide and instructor in Kona, Hawaii for 5 years. Now, almost 3000 dives later, Rod has married his fine art, design, and television background with his diving skills and is designing websites for dive operators, and writing articles and shooting images for dive and travel related companies.

Rod’s work as been published in a number of magazines including Scuba Diving Magazine, Sport Diver, Asian Diver, Sportdiving Australia and Fathoms Magazine. In addition, Rod conducts digital workshops at various resorts and liveboards: these have included a number of Aggressor vessels, Kungkungan Bay Resort, N. Sulawesi, the Ocean Rover, Thailand, and Scuba Club Cozumel, Mexico. He will be conducting a digital workshop at the upcoming Beneath The Sea Show held in NY in March 2006.


Pierre Cotton - http://www.underwater-festival.com/ : 2003, 2004

Born in 1 June 1948, his passion for the sea has been manifested in very  early ages. During all his youth which took place in Antibes, his pleasures were totally centered on the sea and the underwater world. When he was fifteen, he met Daniel Mercier who have initiated him into the scuba diving and with whom he took part in the creation of one of the biggest diving club of France, the Spondyle Club . Thirty years ago he participated to the first edition of the World Festival of Underwater Pictures in Antibes. After fifteen years of a professional career in computer which was carried out concurrently, he abandoned all to dedicate himself, always beside Daniel Mercier, to the development of the Festival of which he is manager for 13 years.



Daniel Mercier - http://www.underwater-festival.com/ : 2003, 2004

Daniel Mercier was born in 1931 in Clamart in the Parisian region. Sensitive to his environment, he has spent all his life making divers and people aware of sea wealth and resources. In 1967, he became a State scubadiving instructor. Today, he possesses his State 3rd degree, the best at a national level. He made more than 7,000 dives in the world oceans and seas, as much in exploration dives as being a Sea Instructor and Guide.  He created the first World Festival of Underwater Pictures in 1974. Its aim was to promote underwater world, to stimulate image creation and to make this event a place where sea lovers can meet. Convinced that promoting submarine funds and scubadives environment is necessary, Daniel Mercier untiringly continues to make most people know them all over the world.

He was awarded a great number of rewards as Youth and Sport Gold Medal, International Academy of Underwater Sciences and Techniques Member, in 1997, he was named Man of the Year of scubadiving world in Israel.           


Mirko Zanni : 2007

Mirko Zanni has just about won all major underwater photographic in the world; at Celebrate the Sea, he took top honour – the AWARDS of Excellence in 2001 and 2004. In 1989, Swiss-born Mirko Zanni enrolled in an open water diving course with a friend, hoping to explore even more of the colourful world. Though he was a photographer by nature, it was a while before he began taking pictures of the fabulous fish and landscapes he had seen. Photography was always a passion of mine: the camera was an essential tool to bring with me on any occasion; to immortalise the places, actions, people and wonderfully colourful events. After a few years of diving he decided to merge his two passions photography and the underwater world into one. Mirko learned the practical techniques from the field’s biggest photographer ,and began practising in the rivers near his home. Now he dives all over the world with his girlfriend and model, Tanja Porta. Mirko’s photographic tastes are diverse his most favourite subjects are tiny fishes (for which he uses his macro lens) and spectacular wide-angle shots, taken with his prized 16mm fish-eye lens. His work regularly appears in magazines Diving a Fondo (Spain), SUB (Italy), Neptun 21(Russia) and Aquanaut (Germany). Mirko he has won numerous photographic awards around the world, including the prestigious Festival in Antibes, Oceanz, CTS, LAUPS, Subios and at the  Marmara at the Underwater Photography World Champion 2000.



Dr Sylvia Earle : 2006, 2011

Marine Biologist Sylvia Earle is sometimes known as “Her Deepness” or “The Sturgeon General” – has been an explorer-in-residence at the National Geographic Society since 1998. Named Time magazine’s first “hero for the planet” in 1998, Earle has pioneered research on marine ecosystems and has led more than 50 expeditions totaling more than 6,000 hours underwater. She holds numerous diving records, including setting the women’s depth record for solo diving at a thousand meters (3,300 feet).  “I was swept off my feet by a wave when I was three and have been in love with the sea ever since,” Earle said. “Even as a child I was lured into the sea by the creatures who live there: horseshoe crabs on the New Jersey beaches; starfish and sea urchins in the Florida Keys; and everywhere strange and wonderful forms of life that occur only underwater. It was and is irresistible.”

Former chief scientist for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earle is author of more than 125 scientific and popular publications, including a 1995 book, Sea Change. Her research places special emphasis on marine plants and the development of technology for access and research in the deep sea. She played a key role in a decision in early 1999 by the Clinton Administration to double the budget of the U.S. National Marine Sanctuaries.  Earle was born August 30, 1935, in Gibbstown, New Jersey. She has a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University and a master’s degree and doctorate from Duke University as well as 12 honorary doctorate degrees. She lives in Oakland, California.


David Doubilet - www.daviddoubilet.com - 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011

One of the world’s leading underwater photographers, David Doubilet has shot more than 60 stories for National Geographic magazine since 1972. Doubilet’s undersea reporting has taken him to the Red Sea, Pearl Harbor, the South Pacific and beyond. He has captured groundbreaking images of great white sharks, flashlight fish, shark-repelling flounders, creatures of the undersea desert, fluorescent coral, WW II wrecks and much more.

A consummate artist, award-winning photographer David Doubilet began photographing underwater environments at the age of 12 in the cold, green seas off the northern New Jersey coast. He used a Brownie Hawkeye camera wrapped in a clear plastic bag, and he's been behind the lens ever since. In 1971 he began contracting as a photographer for the National Geographic Society, and he now has photo- graphed over 50 articles for National Geographic magazine. About his work for National Geographic, Doubilet says, "My job description is to make a picture of a place no one has ever seen before...or to make a picture that's different of a place that everybody's seen before."

Doubilet's recent assignments have taken him to the waters around Australia. Off Australia's southern coast, he focused on the endangered great white shark. Doubilet observed, "The great white shark is the ultimate predator, a living myth. But it is not a nightmare...It dominates its world, but is threatened by ours."

One of National Geographic's most popular and entertaining speakers, Doubilet will offer a thrilling behind-the-scenes look at these two marvels of the ocean world. He will also describe a long-term research and conservation initiative being undertaken by the National Geographic Society to encourage better stewardship of the oceans.

David Doubilet was born 11/28/46 in New York City.  Now age 52, he began snorkeling at the age of eight in the cold, green seas off the northern New Jersey coast.  By the age of thirteen, he was taking black and white pictures above and below the sea with his first camera -- a pre-war Leica. Parts of summer and winter vacations were spent at Small Hope Bay Lodge on Andros Island in the Bahamas.  He worked as a diving guide and on days off would take his camera.  Doubilet later spent several summers working as a diver and photographer for the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratories in New Jersey.  He is presently a Contract Freelance Photographer for the National Geographic Society where he has been steadily working for twenty-seven years.

In 1965 Doubilet began studying film and journalism at Boston University's College of Communication.  He majored in still photography and graduated in 1970 with a Bachelor of Science degree.  In 1988 he received their Distinguished Alumni of the Year award.  During the summer of 1966, he attended a pilot course in underwater photography at the Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California. Doubilet's first work for National Geographic Magazine was published in 1972.  Since then, as a Contract Photographer for NGM, he has produced over fifty stories for the magazine, in recent years adding author to his credit line of photographer.  His warm-water work has taken him throughout Indonesia, Micronesia, Australia and New Guinea in the Pacific; Sri Lanka and the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean; and all over the Caribbean.  The Red Sea, his favorite "underwater studio", has produced at least ten different stories for the magazine.  Cold-water work has immersed him off the coast of England; in Scotland's Loch Ness; into the teeming waters of the Galapagos; around the mysterious shores of Japan; and deep in Canada's Northwest Pacific.  He has also worked off the entire eastern coast of the United States -- from Maine to the Florida Keys -- and California.

Doubilet's photography has won many prizes including in 1969 the prestigious "Sara Prize and International Award" given by Mondo Sommerso Magazine in Italy.  He was the first American and the youngest person to win this award.  In 1975 he was named "Diver of the Year" by the Boston Sea Rovers, one of the diving world's most honorable organizations.  He has also received several honorable mentions by the National Press Photographer's Association over the last decade.  In 1993 he was honored in France by winning first place trophy in the Professional Category of an international contest sponsored by C.M.A.S.  (World Underwater Federation); and by appearing as Guest of Honor at the 20th World Festival of Underwater Photography in Cap D'Antibes. Although most of Doubilet's photographic time is spent working for the National Geographic Society and its diverse publications, his work has also appeared worldwide in other magazines and books.  His commercial work includes several ad campaigns for clients such as Kodak, Fa Soap, Vitaspa, Seagrams, and Microsoft.  He did the still photography for two films -- THE DEEP and SPLASH.

Doubilet's first book, LIGHT IN THE SEA, was published in 1989 by Thomasson-Grant in the USA.  Foreign editions were printed in Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy and Japan.  Doubilet's second book PACIFIC: AN UNDERSEA JOURNEY was published in 1992 by Bulfinch Press, received an award from the American Institute of Graphic Arts and went into a soft-cover edition in Japan.  UNDER THE SEA FROM A TO Z written by Anne L. Doubilet with photographs by David Doubilet was published in 1991 by Crown Press (Random House) and received notable mentions from a national organization of science teachers and a national children's panel.

A popular speaker and instructor, Doubilet has appeared on the "Today Show" on NBC-TV and is in demand for his lectures and slide shows at universities, underwater film festivals and clubs (the Explorer's Club and the Harvard Club both in NYC) around the world.  In 1993 Doubilet broadcast a live underwater interview for National Public Radio from twenty feet deep in Ginnie Springs, Florida.  In 1995-1996 Doubilet and his work are featured in a national advertising campaign for the Rolex Watch Co. From 1994 through 1996 he is the author of a popular monthly feature entitled "Magnificent Moments", including text and photography, in Japan's SINRA Magazine.


Bernardo Sambra : 2006

Is a Peruvian underwater and wildlife photographer. After more than 20 years of diving around the world, Bernardo has evolved from being a spear fishing fan to a defender of ecology and underwater wildlife through the use of photography. Conscious of the need to increase people’s knowledge about and respect for the natural resources of his country, Bernardo decided a few years ago to expand his activity as photographer and include images of the Peruvian wildlife.


Al Hornsby : 2006

When Al Hornsby first starting diving in Guam at the age of 12, his obsession with the ocean began and he has never looked back. With 29 years behind him as a fulltime dive professional, as a dive instructor, a senior executive at PADI, editor and group publisher at Skin Diver Magazine and now back with PADI once again, he continues to take pictures and write about his favorite adventures in the underwater world. He is well-known in the diving community for a broad range of pursuits, beyond photography, including writing and performing ocean-related music and being a published author of poetry and a book, “This Is the Caribbean.” His multi-projector slide shows have been seen in film festivals worldwide.



Tay Kay Chin : 2006

A 2003 Hasselblad Master, trained as a photojournalist at the University of Missouri-Columbia, with the help of scholarships from Kodak, the Los Angeles Times and Fujifilm. Upon graduation, he joined The Straits Times as a photographer, before becoming its Picture Editor in 1999. His stint at the Times included two years at the paper’s web edition. In Oct 99, he quit the paper to become a freelance photographer and web consultant and his web design works include two redesigns of The Straits Times Interactive. His works are collected by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Singapore, the European House of Photography in Paris, and private collectors. He has participated in group and solo exhibitions in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sydney, and Singapore.

 


Bridget Chapman 2006

Bridget Chapman is an experienced biologist with a Masters in Education and has taught in many schools in different countries. She is a very keen diver with a dive master certificate and is pro-active in marine conservation & education.


Bryan Dias, Program Manager :2008

Bryan has been working in conservation for over six years. Before coming to CORAL, he was the Director of Outreach and Education for the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) in Key Largo, Florida. Prior to REEF, Bryan worked for the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) in Alviso, CA. He has also worked in the private sector in ecotourism and international trade. He has a Master’s degree from the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) in International Environmental Policy where he focused on coastal zone management, marine policy, environmental economics, and sustainable tourism. His undergraduate work took place at the University of California San Diego where he finished with a degree in history and political science. Bryan is also a ‘semi-retired’ SCUBA instructor having worked in the industry in California, Honduras, Colombia, and Mexico.


Ferdie Marcelo 2008

Ferdie Marcelo is the Seacology Field Representative for the Philippines. Prior to joining Seacology, Ferdie worked for six years for the Philippine Senate where he often backstopped for the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources, as well as the Committee on Education. He was also involved with the Technical Working Group that drafted the Solid Waste Management Act, and the Medium-Term Higher Education Development and Investment Plan.

An avid scuba diver since being certified in 1985, Ferdie eventually earned his NAUI instructor rating in 1991.  Working as a free-lance divemaster and instructor enabled him to dive in many places all over the Philippines.  Ferdie’s CTS presentation will focus on Seacology’s win-win projects in the Philippines. Seacology is an international ngo with the sole purpose of preserving the environments and cultures of islands throughout the world.  Seacology does this by giving villagers a tangible incentive they request such as a school, community center or fresh water delivery system in exchange for establishing a marine or forest reserve.

 

Lynn Funkhouser, www.lynnfunkhouser.com : 2008, 2009

Lynn Funkhouser was inducted into the inaugural Women Divers Hall of Fame. She is an internationally published photographer, author, lecturer, environmentalist, adventuress, and leader in dive travel. She specializes in underwater, nature, travel, and environmental images. Lynn's dramatic photos have been published in calendars, ads, and major magazines, notably in "Audubon," "Animals," "Action Asia," "International Wildlife," "Time," "Newsweek" and "National Geographic" Publications, etc. She also has exhibited her work in many galleries .

As an environmentalist, Lynn is committed to making a difference on this planet through her images and lectures. One of the founders of the International Marinelife Alliance (IMA) in 1985, Lynn serves on the Board of Directors. Lynn was honored to receive the 1994 SEASPACE / PADI Environmental Awareness Award which recognizes outstanding effort in the cause of marine conservation and education "for her continuing efforts promoting reef preservation in the Philippines and around the world." She also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Philippine Aquatic and Marinelife Conservationists' Association, Inc. (PAMARCON) for "her outstanding contributions on behalf of the conservation and preservation of the marine environment of the Philippines."

She is an expert on diving in the Philippine Islands spending 2 months every year since 1976 diving 250 islands. She was a special consultant to the John G. Shedd Aquarium for the 15,000 square. ft. building. addition, "Wild Reef" featuring Apo Island, Philippines, which opened in 2003. She leads several dive trips a year to the Philippines. She was also a special consultant to the Smithsonian Institution on Shells and Ocean Planet, 1995. She served as the photographer on the research project - Shiraho Coral Reef & the Proposed New lshigaki Island Airport, Japan, with a review of the status of the coral reefs of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, prepared by the International Marinelife Alliance Canada for Species Survival Commission and the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, Switzerland, which saved Shiraho's 600 year old blue coral reef from becoming an airport. It was the first environmental research study to stop a Japanese project.


Brad Norman: www.ecocean.org : 2007

Since 1994, Brad Norman of Murdoch University and the not-for-profit group ECOCEAN Inc. has demonstrated commitment to the study and conservation of whale sharks, and the results of his open, cooperative approach to research have set new standards for the international study of the species.

However, these ongoing, high-level efforts for whale shark conservation are only a small part of Brad’s commitment to the whale sharks, and his coordination of the long-term monitoring program has helped to build a bridge between the ecotourism and scientific communities. By developing personal relationships with the local dive industry and by creating cutting-edge software to identify whale sharks from photographs, Brad and his colleagues have effectively engaged ecotourists to obtain unprecedented levels of data collection for this poorly understood species. The ECOCEAN Whale Shark Photo-identification Library (http://www.whaleshark.org), which houses these data, has grown over thirteen years into an international, online research platform that links ‘team members’ from six countries in a centralized network.  This has served to facilitate a cooperative approach to standardized data collection and analysis, important to help obtain a global picture of the behaviour and health of whale sharks in general.

Accomplishments and awards, including those of ECOCEAN, include:
 
The development of a pattern recognition system based on NASA technology that allows computers to distinguish individual whale sharks from photographs
The development of a set of long-term population models to track the trends of whale sharks in Australia (which can be used at other worldwide locations).
A Duke’s Choice Award 2005 (SunMicrosystems) for Innovative Use of Java Technology in the ECOCEAN Whale Shark Photo-identification Library
A Rolex Award for Enterprise 2006 to expand the ECOCEAN Library to 20 international field stations. This award was the first granted to an Australian in 25 years.
Whitley Awards 2007 – Associate Award
The Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Award 2007


Mark Erhmann PhD :  2004, 2011

Mark Erdmann is the Senior Advisor to Conservation International’s Indonesia Marine Program, with a primary focus on managing CI’s marine conservation initiatives in the Bird’s Head Seascape in West Papua. Mark is a coral reef ecologist (PhD University of California, Berkeley) who has lived and worked for the past 20 years in Indonesia. During this time he has logged nearly 10,000 SCUBA dives while surveying marine biodiversity throughout the region, discovering 16 new mantis shrimp species and 31 new coral reef fishes (including the Indonesian coelacanth).  He has published 91 scientific articles and 2 books, as well as numerous popular articles in diving and nature magazines. Though his work is now largely focused on marine conservation and the management of marine protected areas (MPAs), his continuing research interests include reef fish biodiversity, mantis shrimp ecology and systematics, genetic connectivity in MPA networks, and coral reef restoration techniques. In 2004, Erdmann was awarded a Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation, with a focus on providing experiential marine conservation education to 3 key Indonesian stakeholder groups: schoolchildren, journalists, and members of the Indonesian legal system. Mark now lives with his wife and three children in Bali, while making frequent trips to Papua and elsewhere in Indonesia and SE Asia.


Bill Macdonald, environmental film producer 2011

Bill Macdonald is a film producer whose mission is to document aquatic resources, marine life, and watersheds. Macdonald employs high definition video footage to produce educational programming on watershed awareness. We make broadcast quality promotional videos that capture the very best in underwater experiences at the world’s foremost dive resorts and live-a-board dive vessels. Bill has been diving for over 50 years and has been active in early  SCUBA diving sales and instruction. Macdonald spent five years with the Cousteau Society lecturing to some 250 university audiences from 1975 thru 1980.

Bill Macdonald has recently produced a series of short subject programs to create an entire presentation dubbed SEA PULSE.  The program depicts the beauty of the world ocean’s most biodiverse reefs. The threats to this world ocean are then depicted in the most recent Algalita program (“Synthetic Sea 2010?) featuring Captain Charles Moore, the dean of marine debris researchers. Additional programs in Sea Pulse document a wetlands steward proving the power of one person to clean and restore the Los Cerritos Wetlands, and Dance 4 Oceans where “trashy, plastic draped zombie dancers” emerge from the sea to protest whales dying from ingesting plastic. The Sea Pulse program grew out of Macdonald’s  presentation at the The Florida Keys Eco Week in the fall of 2010.In 2000 Bill began to work with Captain Charles Moore and the Algalita Marine Research Foundation to document the unfortunate build-up of marine debris in the world ocean, and produced a signature film: “Synthetic Sea” that soon became a series. “Our Synthetic Sea” won an award for excellence at the Santa Cruz Environmental Film Festival. “Synthetic Sea” has been translated into Japanese and Spanish. The “Synthetic Sea Story” (2006) is a half hour overview of the state of the art regarding marine debris issues.Bill has documented the use of frigid Deep Ocean Water for sustainable human life support systems to help remedy global warming. Systems include OTEC energy, air conditioning, aquaculture, and dew point agriculture. Dubbed the “Blue Green Renaissance” the footage depicts the research of Dr Sylvia A Earle and famed sub-mariner John Craven.

Recent DVD production in association with Thalassa – Manado, this program in Bahasan language, provides Indonesian remote villages with sustainable fishing practices, and concepts of reef protection. Macdonald Productions is actively providing Broadcast TV with footage. Recently Bill’s footage was used for the background in Oprah Winfrey’s 2009 & 2010 Earth Day show, “Life After People”, and Cyber Network (Tokyo) “Plastic Debris, Rivers to Sea”.


Dustin Macdonald

Chair, Santa Cruz Chapter of Surfrider Foundation

Throughout the course of 30 years of world travel, including Central America, Europe, Asia, Indonesia, and Micronesia, Dustin Macdonald has developed an understanding of the need for a concerted effort to eliminate ocean pollution. Son of environmental film producer, Bill Macdonald, he is committed to preserving the oceanic resources that remain while attempting to bring back some of the precious resources we have already lost.

As soon as he could walk, Dustin would venture out to sea on his first dive boat excursion. Having lived around the ocean his whole life, he was diving at the age of 8 and surfing by 11. He has also been a competitive ocean racing sailor for over 20 years. Combing his passion for the ocean with an undeniable calling to protect it, he has worked with Macdonald Productions in the creation of ocean-oriented films for a quarter of a century.

Together with his father, he co-produce films like The Synthetic Sea Story (2010), the latest on marine debris studies conducted by Algalita Marine Research Foundation. Featuring Captain Charles Moore and with an interview with Dr. Anthony Andrady, both leading authorities on how plastic breaks down in the marine environment, the film documents the latest Pacific Gyre voyage. It also touches on California coast considerations, the endocrine disruption problem on ocean foods webs, and a series of initial solutions humans can employ.

More recently, Dustin designed the web site for and helped to market Sea Pulse (www.seapulsefilms.com), an annual film festival, which presents the beauty of the world oceans’ most biodiverse reef habitats. A graphic designer by trade, he is Founder and President of Macdonald Design, Inc., through which he works largely with ocean-oriented non-profits and dive resorts across the world.

Dustin’s marine environmental protection efforts have taken him as far away as Indonesia, where he gave a presentation at a specialty dive and tourism school about local issues, including plastic pollution, over-fishing, bomb fishing, gill netting, and shark finning. Additionally, he addressed how avoiding further environmental degradation and cleaning up the local reefs and oceans would have immediate positive benefits on a local level, both in terms of health and financial stability. That presentation’s framework was later converted to a script for a film on the same subject presented in English and Bahasa Indonesia.

Equally actively engaged in ocean protection in his home town of Santa Cruz, California, Dustin has volunteered for his local Surfrider chapter for over five years, currently as Chair and previously as both Chair and Vice-Chair. His past successes with Surfrider include the implementation of a local ban on styrofoam to-go containers and the organization of a plastic-to-oil system demo in Venice, California. Currently, Dustin is leading efforts to ban plastic bags locally and state-wide.


Steve Jones 2011

Steve Jones is a professional photojournalist based in the UK.  Having learned to dive at the age of 14, Steve spent most of the 90’s working as a professional dive guide in the Indian Ocean where his passion for photography led to him working as assistant to some of the worlds top underwater photographers.  This lead to his own first break when in 1996, respected German magazine “Unterwasser” published his own work. Steve’s images and articles have subsequently been published around the world in magazines such as Ocean Geographic, DIVE, Tauchen and Scuba Diving as well as in newspapers such as the Times and the Telegraph.  He has also contributed to numerous book projects, winning a number of awards along the way.


He is a true all rounder as a photographer, being equally at home photographing deep wrecks in the North Atlantic as working with the critters of the Indo-Pacific More of Steve’s work can be seen at www.millionfish.com